alexa Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea | Norway | PDF | PPT| Case Reports | Symptoms | Treatment

OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Recommended Conferences

Read more

Recommended Journals

Relevant Topics

Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

  • Share this page
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • Blogger
  • Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea describes frequent, watery bowel movements (diarrhea) that occur in response to medications used to treat bacterial infections (antibiotics). Typically, no pathogens are identified and the diarrhea is caused by changes in the composition and function of the intestinal flora. Most patients respond to supportive measures and discontinuation of antibiotics.

  • Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Symptoms

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea can cause signs and symptoms that range from mild to severe. For most people, antibiotic-associated diarrhea causes mild signs and symptoms, such as: Loose stools, More-frequent bowel movements Some people experience a more serious form of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. When the overgrowth of harmful bacteria is severe, you may have signs and symptoms of colitis or pseudomembranous colitis, such as: Frequent, watery diarrhea, Abdominal pain and cramping, Fever, Mucus in stool, Bloody , stools, Nausea and Loss of appetite.

  • Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Causes

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea occurs when antibacterial medications (antibiotics) upset the balance of good and bad bacteria in gastrointestinal tract. Nearly all antibiotics can cause antibiotic-associated diarrhea, colitis or pseudomembranous colitis. The antibiotics most commonly linked to antibiotic-associated diarrhea include: Cephalosporins, such as cefixime (Suprax) and cefpodoxime, Clindamycin (Cleocin), Penicillins, such as amoxicillin (Amoxil, Larotid, others) and ampicillin, Fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro) and levofloxacin (Levaquin).

  • Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Treatment

    The current guidelines from the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) for the initial management of C. difficile colitis are clear and widely accepted. In the vast majority of patients AAD is a mild and self- limited illness that responds to the discontinuation of antibiotics, supportive care, and fluid and electrolyte replacement.c

Expert PPTs

Speaker PPTs

 

High Impact List of Articles

Conference Proceedings