alexa A Dentigereus Cyst Containing Displaced Tooth In The Maxillary Sinus | OMICS International
ISSN: 2161-1122
Dentistry
Like us on:
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700+ peer reviewed, Open Access Journals that operates with the help of 50,000+ Editorial Board Members and esteemed reviewers and 1000+ Scientific associations in Medical, Clinical, Pharmaceutical, Engineering, Technology and Management Fields.
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on
Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business

A Dentigereus Cyst Containing Displaced Tooth In The Maxillary Sinus

Sahin C1*, Uzun A2 and Parlak S2

1Sakarya government hospital ENT Clinic, Sakarya, Turkey

2Hasvak Hospital Ankara, Turkey

*Corresponding Author:
Dr. Caner Sahin
Sakarya government hospital ENT Clinic
Sakarya, Turkey
Tel: +90 5345116076
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date : February 12, 2014; Accepted date : February 22, 2014; Published date : February 24, 2014

Citation: Sahin C, Uzun A, Parlak S (2014) A Dentigereus Cyst Containing Displaced Tooth in the Maxillary Sinus. Dentistry 4:211. doi: 10.4172/2161-1122.1000211

Copyright: © 2014 Sahin C, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.



Visit for more related articles at Dentistry

Abstract

Ectopic eruption of tooth has been reported in the nasal septum, chin, palate, coronoid process and maxillary sinus in the literature. A tooth may erupt maxillary sinus and present with chronic sinusitis, mucosele and cyst formation. Obstruction the osteomeatal complex, formation of cyst in the maxillary sinus, obstruction of nasolacrimal canal leading to epiphora may occur because of the anatomic variation. There may be sinonasal symptoms of sinusitis, epiphora and pain. The diagnosis of this condition can be made radiologically. If it is symptomathic treatment of ectopic maxillary tooth with dentigerous cyst is surgical removal via a Caldwell-Luc procedure. Herein we present an original image of a dentigerous cyst containing premolar tooth in the maxillary sinus.

Keywords

Tooth eruption; Maxillary sinus; Dentigerous cyst

Case Report

A 43-year-old man was presented with the complaints of recurrent pain and pressure in right maxillary sinus region. He had a history of recurrent sinusitis of 5 years duration. The symptoms did not resolve despite several courses of medical therapy. The past medical history was unremarkable.

Findings of anterior rhinoscopy examination were normal. In the endoscopic examination mucoid secretion was seen in right middle meatus. External examination of teeth revealed normal findings. There was no history of tooth extraction. There was no swelling in maxillary region. Intraoral examination was normal. Ocular examination was normal. Findings of blood and serum biochemistry were within normal limits. A plain computed tomography (CT) scan of the paranasal sinuses was done by taking 3-mm coronal slices. CT examination of the paranasal sinuses revealed a dentigerous cyst containing first premolar tooth in the maxillary sinus. The cyst was seen to expand in the alveolar process of the maxillary bone (Figure 1). The patient did not accept the recommended surgical treatment.

dentistry-computed-tomography

Figure 1: A computed tomography (CT) scan of the paranasal sinuses revealed a dentigerous cyst containing first premolar tooth in maxillary sinus. The cyst made expansion in alveolar process of maxillary bone.

Discussion

Maxillary dentigerous cysts are common disorders of the maxillary sinus. Most frequently, the cysts are incidental findings on radiographs. Etiology of the disease is not clear; inflammation, infection, allergy, odontogenic and rhinologic factors are believed to play role.

The etiology of ectopic tooth eruption is still unclear. During development any abnormal tissue interaction between these cells may result in ectopic tooth development and eruption to different places may occur. The tooth can migrate to several locations including the maxillary sinus, nose, and infraorbital area [1]. Tooth development into the maxillary sinus is rare [2]. This eruption may lead to local sinonasal sign and symptoms attributed to recurrent sinusitis. Obstruction the osteomeatal complex, formation of cyst in the maxillary sinus, obstruction of nasolacrimal canal leading to epiphora may occur because of the anatomic variation [3,4]. Approximately 50 cases of a tooth in the nasal cavity have been reported in the literature [5].

The diagnosis of this condition can be made radiologically. Radiographs of the maxillary sinuses show of the highly radiopaque tooth and related situations. In the present case, the condition was detected using paranasal sinus tomography.

Patients with an ectopic tooth eruption into the maxillary sinus can remain asymptomatic. In the literature local sinonasal sign and symptoms like nasal obstruction, facial fullness, headache and epiphora were reported [6]. In the present case the patient complained of facial fullness and headache.

If it is symptomathic treatment of ectopic maxillary tooth with dentigerous cyst is surgical removal via a Caldwell-Luc procedure. Removal of the all antral tissue is crucial and assessment of the all resected soft tissue histologically is also crucial. This is important as certain antral diseases like odontogenic keratosis may co-exist with an ectopic premolar. Displacement of teeth by expansion of any dental pathology like odontogenic keratosis may result ectopic eruption of such teeth. If there is no assosiated unusual pathology, surgery can provide cure. In our case the patient did not accept recommended surgery. We cannot discuss about the treatment because of the reason but we present intense image of a cyst containing tooth. This reminds us to further evaluate patients of chronic sinusitis to make appropriate diagnosis.

References

Select your language of interest to view the total content in your interested language
Post your comment

Share This Article

Relevant Topics

Article Usage

  • Total views: 11819
  • [From(publication date):
    March-2014 - Feb 20, 2018]
  • Breakdown by view type
  • HTML page views : 8038
  • PDF downloads : 3781
 

Post your comment

captcha   Reload  Can't read the image? click here to refresh

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2018-19
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2018 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version