alexa An Ethnobotanical Survey for Tropical Sand Dune Support Greenbelt International Airport Yogyakarta (NYIA) Glagah Village, District Temon, Kulon Progo, Yogyakarta Indonesia

ISSN: 2473-3350

Journal of Coastal Zone Management

An Ethnobotanical Survey for Tropical Sand Dune Support Greenbelt International Airport Yogyakarta (NYIA) Glagah Village, District Temon, Kulon Progo, Yogyakarta Indonesia

Jati Batoro*
Biology Department, University of Brawijaya, Malang, East Java, Indonesia
*Corresponding Author: Jati Batoro, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology Department, University of Brawijaya, Jl. Veteran, Malang 65145, East Java, Indonesia, Tel: +62-341-575841, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Sep 06, 2017 / Accepted Date: Nov 24, 2017 / Published Date: Dec 04, 2017

Abstract

Aim of survey research on the type of Gumuk Pasir Tropik (Tropical Sand Dunes) is intended to reveal species diversity, a system of knowledge that includes the use, knowledge and fulfilment of its various needs. The survey was conducted to document plant diversity, supporting the greenbelt construction of the NYIA airport to take its documentation and sustainable development. The location of the research was conducted at NYIA Airport in Glagah village, Temon district, Kulon Progo regency, Yogyakarta Province Indonesia. The research was conducted using structural and open ended interview, direct observation and survey. Local people have a good knowledge of the diversity of plant species. However, lack of wisdom in the management resulted in natural forest sand dune ecological damage. The survey of local people in Glagah village resulted in identification of 84 plants that are presented in the pape

Keywords: Ethnobotanical survey; Sand dune; Greenbelt; Yogyakarta

Introduction

Glagah village is limited to the south of Indonesia Sea, West of Palihan village, East times Karangwuni village and north of Kalidengen village (Figure 1). The total area of the Glagah village 603.94 hectare covers 16.64% of the total area of Temon district. The village has 8 Dukuh via Glagah, Sangkretan, Bebekan, Macanan, Kretek, Sidorejo, Bapangan and Kepek. Glagah village has a height of 1-6 MASL (Metres above sea level) with a slope level of 0-1%, the air temperature is approximately 25-33°C and the average rainfall every year 2.342 mm per year.

coastal-zone-management-map-glagah-village

Figure 1: (A) Map of Glagah village, Temon district, Kulon Progo, Yogyakarta and NYIA airport locations of study sites; (B) Gumuk Pasir Tropik (tropical sand dune).

Coastal dune environments are selective ecosystems characterized by a close interaction between abiotic and biotic factors in a dynamic balance [1]. Sand dune conservation is becoming an important plan to be implemented, on the one hand, sand dune has the potential landscape which can still developed further, and sand dune can be a barrier saviour of community behind these dunes. Sustainability and stability of sand dune can reduce tsunami attack caused by earthquake [2]. Sand dune or sand beach in Glagah village is state land which is traditionally a Pakualaman area. The area is sandy due to the combination of sand or by the wind, the sea wave’s south coast (Samodra Indonesia). Studies reported the succession rate in a primary series represented a unimodal relation with total species richness. On the other hand species poor vegetation often dominated by one species, such as heathlands [3].

Local types of plants and animals are typical in the tropical sand dune area. Typical plant species include Pandanus (Pandanus tectorius), Balaran (Ipomoea pescaprae), Krandan (Canavalia maritima), Preketekan (Spinifex littorius), Widoro (Ziziphus mauritiana), Carex sp., Cimplukan (Physalis minima), Telekan (Lantana camara), Nomlang (Passiflora foetida), Alang-alang (Imperata cylindrica), Sembung (Eupatorium inulifolium), Brobos (Centrosoma pubescent), Widuri (Calotropis gigantea), Sidoguri (Sida rhombifolia), Pulutan (Triumffeta indica) [2]. Studies reported the plant family in tropical sand dunes covers e.g. Pandanaceae, Gramineae, Cyperaceae, Fabaceae, Solanaceae, Malvaceae, Rhamnaceae, Asteraceae, Apocynaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Labiatae, Pasifloraceae. Among the ten plant species in Sand dune Egypt is Tamarix aphylla, Prosopis juliflora, Acacia saligna and Atriplex nummularia show high rates of growth and significant survival rates [4].

Types cultivated of plants that have high economic value are dragon fruit (Hylocereus undatus), Lombok kriting, chili (Capsicum anuum), Semangka, watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and Kambil, coconut (Cocos nucifera). While the types of plants are important to consider in support of green belts NYIA airport such as Pandan (Pandanus tectorius), Balaran (Ipomoea pescaprae), Krandan (Canavalia maritima), Widuri (Calotropis digantea), Carex sp., Preketekan (Spinifex littorius) and introduction species of Cemara laut (Casuarina equisetifolia), Tereside, Gamal (Glyrisidia sepium), Akasia (Acacia aurifiliformis), Waru laut (Hibiscus tiliaceus) [1,2,5]. The industrialization with agriculture and aquaculture e.g. wetlands (tambaks) with increased use of chemical input poses create to coastal environment [6]. Amphibian diversity and reptiles at sand dune Bantul regency Yogyakarta Province identified 11 species namely Cryptoblepharus cursor, Hemidactylus frenatus, Hemidactylus garnotii, Hemidactylus platyurus and Duttaphrynus melanostictus [7,8].

Materials and Methods

The study site is located at the tropical sand dune Glagah village, Yogyakarta Province and Laboratory of Plant Taxonomy Brawijaya University. The research was conducted using structural and open ended interview and direct observation or survey [9,10]. Based on the examination of the material survey and specimens herbarium colection Herbarium Biology Brawijaya University (H.Bio Unibraw). Fresh material colection from survey 2016-2017 in area tropical sand dune Glagah village, Temon district, Yogyakarta Indonesia. From the collection studied by the author, details and identification from dried material, except for floral and fruit sizes, which were based on dehydrated (boiled in water) material [11-14]. Terminologies and methods follows [3,4,9,15]. The identification and nomenclature of the listed plants were based on the Flora of Java and Flora Malesiana.

Results and Discussion

During the present research, inventarization flora local and ethno-botany follow data on 34 families, 84 plant species was collected and preserved at Herbarium Brawijaya University (H Bio Unibraw). The study evidenced that agricultural plays an important role in the enhancement of the livelihoods of local peoples. Several of species and subspecies of wild plants and animal are threatened with extinction. For example: Landak (Hystrix sp.). Biological diversity conservation is and urgent coastal matter [16]. Sand dune is area an important part of coast as because the lands are first defence against the force of the ocean, protecting the diversity of native flora, fauna and the ecosystem as a whole. The other hand the understanding of tropical hydrology can serve important the realism of tropical greenbelt [17].

The types of conservation plants that need to be considered in favour of green belt are Table 1 via Pandan (Pandanus tectorius), Balaran (Ipomoea pescaprae), Krandan (Canavalia maritima), Preketek (Spinifex littorius), Akasia (Acasia aurifiliformis), Widuri (Calotropis gigantea ), Gringging, gamal (Glyricidia sepium), Jambu monyet (Anacardium occidentale), Cemara laut (Casuarina equisetifolia), Jarak (Jatropha curcas), Kelor (Moringa oleifera), Teki pasir (Carex sp., Cyperus spp.), Nomlang (Passiflora foetida), Widoro (Ziziphus mauritiana), Pace (Morinda citrifolia), Cimplukan (Physalis minima) and Singkil (Premma sp.). Sharing animal species on the beach shoreline includes: Undur-undur laut (Emerita spp.), jingking sapi, jingking kebo (Crustacea, Ocypodidae), Gemak (Turnix sylvaticus), Jangkrik (Gryllus campestrix), Kadal laut(Cryptoblepharus cursor), biawak (Varanus sp.), Landak (Hystrix sp.). Jingking sapi (Ocypodidae) widely used local community as a side dish (Jingking pelas). The diversity of fish species in the estuary includes Blanak (Mugil-mugil), petek (Leiognatus equulus), Bojor, Pari (Dasyatis sp.), while crustacean e.g, Shrimp, Kepiting (Brachyura sp.), Udang (Macrura sp.), Urang ayu (Cherax sp.), Siput (Molusca) and green algae.

S.no Local name Scientific name Family Parts used Location and Status
1. Bayam Amaranthus hybridus L. Amaranthaceae Young stem, leaf Sand dune, cultivated
2. Bayam coklat Amaranthus sp. Amaranthaceae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild
3. Bayam duri Amaranthus spinosus L. Amaranthaceae Whole, toxic Sand dune, wild plants
4. Jambu monyet Anacardium occidentale L. Anacardiaceae Stem, drinks, seed, sap fruit toxic Sand dune, cultivated, conservation ⃰
5. Widuri Calotropis gigantea (Willd) Dryand. Ex W.T.Ait Apocynaceae Leaf , wrap paste Sand dune, wild plants ⃰
6. Tapak doro Catharathus roseus (L.) G. Don Apocynaceae Leaf, flower Sand dune, cultivated
7. Klopo/kambil Cocos nucifera L. Arecaceae All plants, vegetable, ritual Sand dune, cultivated
8. Sembung Eupatorium inulifolium H.B.K. Asteracae Leaf, flower,fertilizer Sand dune, wild plant
9 Biden Bidens biternata (Lour) Merr. Asteraceae Animal feed Sand dune, wild plants
10. Tapak liman Gynura crepidiaides L. Asteraceae Leaf, medecine Sand dune, wild plants
11. Telekan Lantana camara L. Asteraceae Whole, toxic Sand dune, wild
12. Tempuyung Emilia sonchifolia (L.) DC. Asteraceae Leaf, medecine Sand dune, wild plants
13. Wedusan Ageratum conizoides L. Asteraceae Animal feed Sand dune, wild plants
14. Sundel Borreria alata Asteraceae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild ⃰
15. Klateng Synedrella nodifora (l.) Gaertn. Asteraceae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild
16. Nanas Ananas camosus (L.) Merr Bromeliaceae Fruit Sand dune, cultivated
17. Buah naga Hylocereus undatus
(Haworth) Britton & Rose
Cactaceae Fruit Sand dune, cultivated
18. Nyamplung Calophyllum inophyllum Callophyllaceae Stem, fruit Sand dune, cultivated
19. Pepaya Carica papaya L. Caricaceae Buah, leaf, vegetable Sand dune, cultivated
20. Cemara laut Casuarina equisetifolia L. Casuarinaceae Would. conservation Sand dune, cultivated ⃰
21. Gewor Comelina nudiflora L. Commelinaceae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild
22. Tela rambat Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lamk. Convolvulaceae Stem, leaf Sand dune, cultivated
23. Tali putri Cuscuta  sp. Convolvulaceae Would, conservation Sand dune, wild ⃰
24. Semangka Citrullus lanatus Cucurbitaceae Liana, fruit Sand dune, cultivated
25. Teki Cyperus rotundus L. Cyperaceae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild plant ⃰
26. Teki Cyperus sp. Cyperaceae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild plant
27. Teki pasir Cyperus melanocephalus Miq. Cyperaceae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild plant ⃰
28. Buntut tikus Acalipha indica L. Euphorbiaceae Leaf, medecine Sand dune, wild
29. Jarak Jatropha curcas L. Euphorbiaceae Fruit, seed, toxic Sand dune, cultivated ⃰
30. Katemas Euphorbia heterophylla Euphorbiaceae Leaf, toxic, animal feed Sand dune, wild plants
31. Patikan Euphorbia hirta Euphorbiaceae Leaf, toxic, animal feed Sand dune, wild
32. Telo kaspo Monihot utilisima Pohl. Euphorbiaceae Radix, stem, leave, food Sand dune, cultivated
33. Meniran Phyllanthus niruri L. Euphorbiaceae Leaf, fruit, medicine Sand dune, wild ⃰
34. Akasia Acasia auriculiformis A. Cunn.ex Bth Fabaceae Would, leaf, conservation Sand dune, cultivated, consernation ⃰
35. Benguk Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC. Fabaceae Seed, toxic, tempe Sand dune, cultivated
36. Brobos Centrosoma pubescent Bth. Fabaceae Leaf, animal seed Sand dune,wild
37. Gringging, gamal Glyricidia sepium (Jacq.) Kunth ex Walp Fabaceae Stem, leave, animal feed Sand dune, cultivated ⃰
38. Kacang brol Arachis hypogaea L. Fabaceae Leaf, seed Sand dune, culivated
39. Kacang tolo Phasolus vulgaris L. Fabaceae Fruit, vegetable Sand dune, cultivated
40. Krandan Canavalia marritima (Aubl.) Urb. Fabaceae Seed: tempe, flower: pecel Sand dune, wild ⃰
41. Mlandingan Leucaena glauca Bth. Fabaceae Fruit, seed, latex medecine Sand dune, cultivated
42. Orok-orok besar Crotalaria mucronata Desv Fabaceae Daun, animal feed Sand dune, wild plants
43. Orok-orok kecil Crotalaria striaca DC Fabaceae Daun, animal feed Sand dune, wild plants
44. Rendetan Desmodium sp. Fabaceae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild
45. Riwilkop Mimosa pudica L. Fabaceae Toxic Sand dune, wild
46. Tom Indigofera sumatrana Gaertn Fabaceae Leaf, color Sand dune, wild ⃰
47. Alang-alang Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv Gramineae Leaf, medecine, animal feed Sand dune, wild
48. Wulu asu Fimbristylis sp. Gramineae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild
49. Rumput gajah Pennisetum purpureum L. Gramineae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, cultivated
50. Empritan Eragrostis amabilis O.K Gramineae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild plants
51. Grinting Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. Gramineae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild
52. Jagung Zea mays L. Gramineae Fruit, leaf, food, animal feed Sand dune, cultivated
53. Kawatan Eleusin indica Gaertn Gramineae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild plants
54. Preketekan, rumput angin Spinifex littorius Merr. Gramineae Flower, toys Sand dune, wild ⃰
55. Sereh Adropogon citratus DC Gramineae Whole plant, flavoring Sand dune, cultivated
56. Rumput Fimbristylis cymosa Gramineae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild
57. Kemangi Ocimum basilicum L. Labiatae Leaf, young stem, vegetable Sand dune, cultivated
58. Sengketan Hyptis suaveolens (.) Poit Labiatae Flower Sand dune, wild
59. Leng-lengan Leucas aspera (Willd) L. Lamiaceae Herb, leaf, medecine Sand dune, Wild
60. Singkil Premma sp. Lamiaceae Habitus, Conservation Sand dune, wild
61. Pulutan Urena lobata L. Malvaceae Toxic, fruit Sand dune, wild plants
62. Sidaguri Sida rhombifolia L. Malvaceae Leaf, animal feed Sand dune, wild plants ⃰
63. Tewel, nongko Artocarpus heterophyllus L. Moraceae Stem, fruit, vegetable, animal feed Sand dune, cultivated
64. Kelor Moringa oleifera Moringiaceae Young eaf Sand dune, cultivated
65. Gedang, Musa paradisiaca L. cv Ambon Musaceae Fruit, stem, latex, flower, leaf Sand dune, cultivated
66. Jambu klutuk Psidium quajava L. Myrtaceae Fruit, leaf, medecine Sand dune, cultivated
67. Pandan duri Pandanus tectorius Soland. Ex Park. Pandanaceae Leaf, roof, mats, conservation Sand dune, wild plants ⃰
68. Nomlang Passiflora foetida L. Passifloraceae Fruit, toxic Sand dune, wild plants ⃰
69. Katu Sauropus androgynus Phyllantaceae Leaf, fruit Sand dune, wild
70. Lang-layangan Drynaria calomelanos Polypodiaceae Steril leaf kites Sand dune, wild plants
71. Widoro Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk. Rhamnaceae Fruit Sand dune, wild plants ⃰
72. Pace Morinda citrifolia L. Rubiaceae Fruit, medecine Sand dune, wild ⃰
73. Balaran Ipomoea pescaprae (L.) R.Br Solanaceae Stem, roof, conservation Sand dune, wild plants ⃰
74. Ipo. Ipomoea sp. Solanaceae Herb Sand dune, wild
75. Cimplukan Physalis minima L. Solanaceae Fruit, medecine Sand dune, wild plants ⃰
76. Lombok kriting Capsicum anuum L. Solanaceae Fruit, chili Sand dune, cultivated
77. Lombok rawit Capsicum frutescents L. Solanaceae Fruit, chili, vegetable Sand dune, cultivated
78. Ranti Solanum torvum SW Solanaceae Fruit, leave, vegetable, medecine Sand dune, wild
79. Terong Solanum melongena L. Solanaceae Fruit, vegetable Sand dune, cultivated
80. Tomat Lycopersicon esculentum L. Solanaceae Fruit, vegetable Sand dune, cultivated
81. Pulutan Triumffeta indica Auct. Non Lamk. Tiliaceae Consevation Sand dune, wild
82. Pecut kuda Stachypeta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl. Verbenaceae Leaf, medecine Sand dune, wild plants
83. Lipi Phyla nodiflora (L.) Righ Verbenaceae Fruit, conservation Sand dune, wild plants ⃰
84. Laos Alpinia galanga (L.) Wild Zingiberaceae Rhizoma, medecine, vegetable Sand dune, cultivated

Annotation: Star Sign (*, Star) type of plant tropical sand dune Glagah village.

Table 1: The different plants used in the five common are tabulated.

The diversity of fauna by the local community is utilized include Undur-undur laut (Emerita sp.), fishing, duck fodder, food (peyek) while Jingking sapi (Crustaceae, Ocypodidae) is foodstuffs (pelas). Lately tropical sand dune area of glagah village is utilized by shrimp farming. While the diversity of wild plants that are exploited are fruit or food (Physalis minima, Ziziphus mauritiana, Passiflora foetida, Canavalia maritima). Pandanus tectorius leaves used to make a hat, the root as a rope (sulur). The diversity agricultural of plants that have high economic value viz. Buah naga, dragon fruit (Hylocereus undatus), Lombok kriting, Chili (Capsicum anuum), Semangka, Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and Kambil or klopo, coconut (Cocos nucifera).

While the types of plants are important to consider in support of green belts NYIA airport is Pandan (Pandanus tectorius), Balaran (Ipomoea pescaprae), Krandan (Canavalia maritima), Widuri (Calotropis digantea), Carex sp., Preketekan (Spinifex littorius), Nyamplung (Calophyllum inophyllum), Keben (Baringtonia asiatica) and species introduction of Cemara laut (Casuarina equisetifolia) [18], Teresidae, gamal (Glyrisidie sepium), Akasia (Acacia auriculiformis). Tree plants species i.e., Keben (Barringtonia asiatica), Nyamplung (Callophyllum inophyllum), Pandan duri (Pandanus tectorius), Jambu monyet (Anacardium occidentale) very good for conserving green belt in tropical sand dune. Coastal sand dunes provide this opportunity, this biological diversity continuity provides an unending source of material research ecological studies [8,18].

Keben (Barringtonia asiatica) family Lecythidaceae, Nyamplung (Calophyllum inophyllum) in the familia Calophyllaceae is native from East Africa, southern coastal India to Malaysia and Pandan (Pandanus tectorius) in the familia Pandanaceae, pakis haji (Cycas rumphii) familia Cycadaceae, Dudulan (Scaeveola taccada) familia Goodinaceae are tree species of flowering plants. The four species are naturally green belt on the sand beach of Alas Purwo National Park East Java. We are sure Dudulan (Scaeveola taccada), Pandanus tectorius, Baringtonia asiatica, Jambu monyet (Anacardium occidenrale) and Calophyllum inophyllum is very well grow as green belt NYIA Airport. Sand dune systems are historically mobile physically and also adaptable physiologically, and have survived many environmental changes in the past [19]. Studies reported Canavalia rosea (Sw.) D.C.; Ipomoea pes-caprae (L.) Sweet. and Schizachyrium scoparium Michx. var. lit- toralis (Nash) Hitch are almost always found growing in places with regular sand movement [20,21]. The function of green belt at sand dune can be a barrier savior of community, ecotorism and can reduce tsunami attack caused by earthquake. The introduction of plant species at Green belt, maybe cause aircraft flight problems with the appearance of certain bird species [22].

Information regarding their vernacular name, botanical name, family, part used and their ethno-agricultural uses are listed below starting with local name, scientific name and family name, part used and Ethno-botany uses and locations (Table 1).

Conclusion

Based on the investigation of specimen herbarium and survey were resulted that there are 34 family, 84 species are recognized. The study evidenced that agricultural plays an important role in the enhancement of the livelihoods of local peoples. A Total of 84 plants consist of tropical sand dune Glagah Village, district Temon, Kulon Progo Regency, Yogyakarta Province existing in the region. Local people have a good knowledge of the diversity of plant species. While the types of plants are important to consider in support of green belts NYIA airport is Pandan (Pandanus tectorius), Balaran (Ipomoea pescaprae), Krandan (Canavalia maritima), Widuri (Calotropis digantea), Carex sp., Preketekan (Spinifex littorius), Carex sp., Nyamplung (Calophyllum inophyllum), Keben (Baringtonia asiatica), Dudulan ((Scaeveola taccada), Jambu monyet (Anacardium occidentale), waru (Hibiscus tiliaceus) and introduction of Cemara laut, Cemara udang (Casuarina equisetifolia), Teresidae, Gamal (Glyrisidie sepium), Akasia (Acacia aurifiliformis).

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to the sponsoring the project and thanks to Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Brawijaya for supporting this research. The researcher also gives thanks to the local communities of local people Glagah village, Kulon Progo. Last but not least, we also thank Trilaksono for the support from the leader Glagah village.

References

Citation: Batoro J (2017) An Ethnobotanical Survey for Tropical Sand Dune Support Greenbelt International Airport Yogyakarta (NYIA) Glagah Village, District Temon, Kulon Progo, Yogyakarta Indonesia. J Coast Zone Manag 20: 452. DOI: 10.4172/2473-3350.1000452

Copyright: © 2017 Batoro J. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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