alexa Cancer, Depression and Cliniclowns | Open Access Journals
ISSN: 2167-1044
Journal of Depression and Anxiety
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700+ peer reviewed, Open Access Journals that operates with the help of 50,000+ Editorial Board Members and esteemed reviewers and 1000+ Scientific associations in Medical, Clinical, Pharmaceutical, Engineering, Technology and Management Fields.
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on
Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business

Cancer, Depression and Cliniclowns

Vincent Van Ginneken*

Blue Green Technologies, Runderweg 6, 8219 PK, Lelystad, The Netherlands

*Corresponding Author:
Vincent Van Ginneken
Blue Green Technologies,
Runderweg 6, 8219 PK, Lelystad, The Netherlands
Tel: +0031623646497
E-mail: vvanginneken@hotmail.com

Received date: April 14, 2017; Accepted date: April 26, 2017; Published date: April 28, 2017

Citation: Ginneken VV (2017) Cancer, Depression and Cliniclowns. J Depress Anxiety S11: e001. doi: 10.4172/2167-1044.S11-e001

Copyright: © 2017 Ginneken VV. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Visit for more related articles at Journal of Depression and Anxiety

Abstract

After a couple of weeks in the hospital, Gijs mistrusted every ‘white jacket’. And even if the doctors left their jacket out, he could smell trouble from a mile distance. With one exception of JoJo and the other clowns from CliniClowns (Figure 1). They never said a word. But just their appearance and a clumpsy play with a small bouncing ball could lighten up the full day. For Gijs and for us, humor was of the essence all along. It is perhaps not the best medication against cancer, but certainly the best medication to live with cancer.

Introduction

After a couple of weeks in the hospital, Gijs mistrusted every ‘white jacket’. And even if the doctors left their jacket out, he could smell trouble from a mile distance. With one exception of JoJo and the other clowns from CliniClowns (Figure 1). They never said a word. But just their appearance and a clumpsy play with a small bouncing ball could lighten up the full day. For Gijs and for us, humor was of the essence all along. It is perhaps not the best medication against cancer, but certainly the best medication to live with cancer.

depression-anxiety-other-clowns

Figure 1: JoJo and the other clowns from Cliniclowns

The purpose of this editorial is to indicate a relatively unknown approach in the ‘hard’ technical hospitalized medical world in order to treat cancer patients. Cliniclowns is a typical example of psychosocial intervention performed in Dutch hospitals where children are animated with cancer in order to forget for a moment their serious illness for the time being. I will broadly outline the limited literature related to cancer patients and depression. Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells and oncology is a branch of medicine that deals with tumors. Recently, I wrote a rather biochemical manuscript entitled “Targeting tumor metabolism: a biochemical explanation related to a Systems Biology Lipidomics Based Approach” [1]. In this rather technical biochemical review a Systems Biology approach was considered. A particular area of interest of Medical Systems-Biology, will be identification of novel safety biomarkers that can be used in the assessment of new intensive treatments both during their discovery phase and in clinical use to study e.g. metabolism-related diseases like cancer/tumors in combining the diagnostics with the patient therapy. Recent technological advances in metabolomics and lipidomics can potentially make a real contribution in increasing efficacy of drug development pipelines. A biomarker is defined as a substance used as an indicator of a biological state. It is characteristic that it is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biological processes, nutritional intervention, pathogenic processes, or pharmacological responses to a therapeutic intervention like nutritional intervention [2] or produced by the tumor or as a consequence of e.g. the tumor environment which is hypoxic and has a low pH due to lactic acid formation, the “Warburg effect” [1].

What is “Systems Biology?” Systems biology is the computational and mathematical modeling of complex biological systems. An emerging engineering approach applied to biological scientific research, systems biology is a biology-based interdisciplinary field of study that focuses on complex interactions within biological systems, using a holistic approach (holism instead of the more traditional reductionism) to biological research or biomedical research [3]. But can we consider a patient as a “system”? A patient has its emotions, fears, depressions, its thoughts, its longings, its dreams but it can also suffer [4].

The whole process in a hospital after adopting a life-threatening illness can be regarded as mental and physical suffering especially for children. Cancer is considered as a serious and potentially lifethreatening illness, and even in some cases deadly diseases without treatment which has an effect on psychological and physiological states of patients. Various studies have demonstrated the high levels of depression in cancer patients using a variety of assessment methods such as self-report, brief screening instruments, and structured clinical interviews.

There are two core symptoms of depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder (fourth edition), namely depressed mood and a marked loss of interest or pleasure in most or all activities. To qualify as depression, one of these two core symptoms must be present for at least 2 weeks, along with at least four other depressive symptoms. Somatic symptoms include fatigue, appetite disturbance or weight loss, sleep difficulties (often marked by frequent interruptions or early morning waking), and difficulties with memory and concentration [5].

In general (adults and children), cancer patients might be vulnerable to depression and anxiety for many reasons: reactions to cancer diagnosis, the presence of unpleasant symptoms associated with cancer (such as pain, nausea and fatigue), and concerns about disease recurrence or progression. Besides, the physiological effects of certain medical drastic measures also influenced anxiety and depression. In addition, advanced cancer is associated with emotional distress, especially depression and feelings of sadness [6,7]. It is unclear what the best way to counter these effects.

The human “mind-spirit-body” interaction is to some extent acknowledged in the triangle mental and psycho-somatic coaching and inter-correlations are extremely important. Psychosomatic medicine is an interdisciplinary medical field exploring the relationships among social, psychological, and behavioral factors on bodily processes and quality of life in humans. Clinical situations where mental processes act as a major factor affecting medical outcomes are areas where psychosomatic medicine has competence [8].

Recently, there are more and more indications cancer patients will benefit from psychosocial interventions by improving the quality of life (QoL) of patients especially in the domain of emotional functioning [9]. For patients with a depression due to cancer disease subsequent recommendations include initiation of antidepressant medication, psychotherapy (with or without concurrent initiation of anxiolytic medication), and consideration of referral to social work services or pastoral services before follow up or reevaluation. [10].

Nevertheless, evidence is accumulating to suggest that identification and treatment of depression among cancer patients will result in reduction in disease progression, improvement in survival rates, reduction in medical costs and improvement in quality of life [10,11].

Conclusion

Finally we come to the recommendation that the future of cancer should follow both approaches in the interest of the patient. Psychosocial interventions focused on the quality of life (QoL) of patients with advanced cancer are on one hand required besides on the other “hard technological medical” approach such as surgery, highdose interferon therapy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Finding of an appropriate effective biomarker via a Systems Biology approach [3] for an early stage diagnosis of a cancer makes the suffering of a patient due to medical treatment for a patient just bearable.

References

Select your language of interest to view the total content in your interested language
Post your comment

Share This Article

Relevant Topics

Recommended Conferences

Article Usage

  • Total views: 168
  • [From(publication date):
    specialissue-2017 - Aug 22, 2017]
  • Breakdown by view type
  • HTML page views : 141
  • PDF downloads :27
 

Post your comment

captcha   Reload  Can't read the image? click here to refresh

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

agrifoodaquavet@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

clinical_biochem@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

business@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

chemicaleng_chemistry@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

environmentalsci@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

engineering@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

generalsci_healthcare@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

genetics_molbio@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

immuno_microbio@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

omics@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

materialsci@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

mathematics_physics@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

medical@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

neuro_psychology@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

pharma@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

social_politicalsci@omicsonline.com

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords