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Cervical Radiograph of a Patient with Cervicogenic Dizziness | OMICS International
ISSN: 2165-7939
Journal of Spine
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Cervical Radiograph of a Patient with Cervicogenic Dizziness

Gary Shum1*, Wayne Whittingham2, Sally Cinnamond1, Sherrie Choy3 and Alan Hough3

1Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of St Mark and St John, Plymouth PL6 8BH, United Kingdom

2Plymouth Chiropractic Clinic, Plymouth, United Kingdom

3Livewell Southwest, NHS, Plymouth, United Kingdom

Corresponding Author:
Gary Shum Faculty
Director of Research, Associate Professor
Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of St Mark
and St John, Plymouth PL6 8BH, United Kingdom
Tel: 01752 636700 (Ext. 5310)
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: Jun 25, 2016; Accepted date: Jun 27, 2016; Published date: Jun 29, 2016

Citation: Shum G, Whittingham W, Cinnamond S, Choy S, Hough A (2016) Cervical Radiograph of a Patient with Cervicogenic Dizziness. J Spine 5:i102. doi:10.4172/2165-7939.1000i102

Copyright: © 2016 Shum G, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Clinical Image

This is a cervical X-ray of a patient suffering from long term dizziness and associated neck pain and stiffness. The X-ray showed that the C1 cervical vertebrae were in a rotated position (Figure 1).

journal-spine-Cevicogenic-dizziness

Figure 1: Cevicogenic dizziness.

In some cases of dizziness, one of the causes can be attributed to pathology or dysfunction of upper cervical spine [1-3]. Poor head and neck posture and mal-aligned upper cervical spine may cause a decreased vertebrobasilar blood flow and contribute to dizziness [4,5]. This form of dizziness can be diagnosed as cervicogenic dizziness. There is a strong correlation in the improvement in the neck symptoms and dizziness [6].

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