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ISSN: 2572-0791
Clinical Depression
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Depression during Adolescence: The Rage Within

Farah Islam*

Faculty of Health, School of Kinesiology and Health Sciences, York University, Toronto, Canada

*Corresponding Author:
Islam F
Faculty of Health, School of Kinesiology and Health Sciences
York University, Toronto, Canada
Tel: + 4167866707
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: February 01, 2016; Accepted Date: February 17, 2016; Published Date: February 23, 2016

Citation: Islam F (2016) Mini Review: Depression during Adolescence: The Rage Within. Clin Depress 2:107. doi:10.4172/2572-0791.1000107

Copyright: © 2016 Islam F. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Abstract

Adolescence is a very trying time for young people. They feel hurt, misunderstood, betrayed and angry at the world. Parental expectations regarding academics and relationships just add fuel to the fire. Often these parent-child conflicts exacerbate the situation. The constant need to please one’s parents with high grades and stellar careers can be too much for a young adult. Around this time, romantic relationships also start and become another breeding ground for conflict. Battles ensue regarding suitable “mates” and “potential spouses”. In the end, parents and young adults can be left feeling angry and betrayed.

Adolescence is a very trying time for young people. They feel hurt, misunderstood, betrayed and angry at the world. Parental expectations regarding academics and relationships just add fuel to the fire. Often these parent-child conflicts exacerbate the situation. The constant need to please one’s parents with high grades and stellar careers can be too much for a young adult. Around this time, romantic relationships also start and become another breeding ground for conflict. Battles ensue regarding suitable “mates” and “potential spouses”. In the end, parents and young adults can be left feeling angry and betrayed.

Migration adds another layer to the puzzle [1]. Oftentimes, first generation migrants bring their unrealized hopes and dreams to the country of their landing. Unfortunately, these unrealized hopes then get transferred onto the backs of their children [2]. These dreams become a burden for adolescents to carry [3]. Sometimes, first generation immigrant parents can feel like they sacrificed a great deal to move to the host country and they believe that they did so for a “better future for their children”. The problem is that this belief can make parents then feel their children “owe” them something in return for their sacrifice. This can be in the form of good grades, successful careers, and bragworthy marriages. This kind of pressure is unfair to youth.

In this study, South Asian youth living in the Peel Region of Toronto were asked to speak about their mental health concerns and barriers they face when seeking mental health care. Ten in-depth 1.5 hour interviews were carried out with South Asian youth and young adults ranging from 15 - 24 years old. South Asian youth reported origins in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Guyana, and Trinidad. Both immigrant and Canadian-born youth participated in the study. Ethics approval was obtained from the Centre of Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

One important result was the finding that children of mothers with untreated postpartum depression often experienced mental health problems themselves in adolescence. While their mothers were unable to seek treatment, the youth had a more open attitude towards seeking mental health care and sought services in their teen years. They hoped that their mothers would follow their example and get help themselves, but this was often not the case, unfortunately.

The major areas of mental health concern stemmed from parent-child conflict regarding grades, school, career, and intimate relationships.

The youth and young adults offered their recommendations and strategies for their parents to improve the parent-child relationship. This action plan is outlined in this paper. Social services, university and college programming, mental health services, and spiritual and community care can implement these strategies into their program planning.

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