alexa Is the Spleen Really Important? | Open Access Journals
ISSN: 2329-8790
Journal of Hematology & Thromboembolic Diseases
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700+ peer reviewed, Open Access Journals that operates with the help of 50,000+ Editorial Board Members and esteemed reviewers and 1000+ Scientific associations in Medical, Clinical, Pharmaceutical, Engineering, Technology and Management Fields.
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on
Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business

Is the Spleen Really Important?

Tatiani Uceli Maioli*
Departamento de Nutricao, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Corresponding Author : Tatiani Uceli Maioli
Departamento de Nutricao
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Tel: +55 31 34099858
E-mail: [email protected]
Received May 23, 2014; Accepted June 11, 2014; Published June 18, 2014
Citation: Maioli TU (2014) Is the Spleen Really Important?. J Hematol Thrombo Dis. 2:144. doi:10.4172/2329-8790.1000144
Copyright: © 2014 Uveli Maioli T. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Related article at
DownloadPubmed DownloadScholar Google

Visit for more related articles at Journal of Hematology & Thromboembolic Diseases

Abstract

The spleen is a mysterious organ located in the left side of the abdominal cavity and is linked to the blood and lymphatic circulation. It is a secondary lymphoid organ and its micro architecture is divided by a trabecular connective tissue which is composed by a red and white pulp. The red pulp (RP) is specialized in the removal of old cells from the blood stream with the help of reticular fibers, fibroblasts and macrophages.

Short Communication
The spleen is a mysterious organ located in the left side of the abdominal cavity and is linked to the blood and lymphatic circulation. It is a secondary lymphoid organ and its micro architecture is divided by a trabecular connective tissue which is composed by a red and white pulp. The red pulp (RP) is specialized in the removal of old cells from the blood stream with the help of reticular fibers, fibroblasts and macrophages. The white pulp (WP) is the splenic lymphoid component and it is structured around a central arteriole where is possible to identify the periarteriolar lymphoid sheath (PALS), the marginal zone (MZ) and the lymphoid follicles (LF). The macrophages from MZ are important antigen processing cells; they express receptor such as SIGNR1 and SINGLEC1 (CD169). There are also B cells in the MZ that are also antigen present cells (APC). The CD4+ T lymphocytes are found in the PALS, whereas IgD+ IgM+ B cells are located in the germinal centers. The spleen anatomy is important for the development of immune responses to different types of antigens as well as to maintain the memory B cell repertoire [1].
Various genes are responsible for the development of the spleen during embryonic fase. The Pbx1, the Bapx1 and the Nkx3.2 are responsible for the expression of homeobox 11 (Hox 11). These genes code for structural components of the spleen. Hox11 knockout (KO) mice do not bear spleens and they are more susceptible to infections. The lymphoid and myeloid colonization of spleen is not well defined yet. The presence of cytokines from lymphotoxin family is fundamental to the cellular arrange of the organ. The chemokine CXCL13 is important for B cell migration to the WP [2,3]. On the other hand, CCL19 and CCL21 are fundamental for the entry of T cells into the spleen. Some selectins are also important; L-selectine, for example, is required for the migration of naïve lymphocytes into the organ [4]. The correct formation of the spleen anatomy is critical for the establishment of interactions between APC and effectors cells leading to fully mature immunological responses.
Despite of the many immunological functions attributed to the spleen, splenectomy is a frequent medical practice in different situations. Clinical studies have reported evidences of uncontrolled infection, and increase incidence of sepse in patients submitted to splenectomy. Because of the spleen complexity and location, it is a key organ for the development of innate and acquired immune responses. Splenic macrophages and dendritic cells are constantly activated because of the blood influx that brings along many antigens from the circulation. This constantly activation of APC is important for T cell stimulation, proliferation and cytokine production. After splenectomy, IFN-gamma levels are usually decreased [5], and this can be one of the reasons for the increased susceptibility to some infections. The spleen integrity is necessary to preserve B cell repertoire, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and maintenance of memory B cells [6]. The production of inflammatory cytokines by lymph nodes is decreased after splenectomy in mice models of Trypanosomacruzi [7], Listeria monocytogenes and of gram negative bacterial infection. In some animal and clinical studies, there is clear evidence showing that the spleen absence increases host mortality [8,9].
The spleen is a neglected organ even in the immunological studies, and this mysterious organ should be better investigated. How lymphoid cells migrate into the spleen, how cells are activated and how they are driven to other lymphoid organs still to be clarified. The importance of the spleen in the development of systemic immune response requires a scientific effort to be described.
The absence of spleen can cause some immunological disorders and increase mortality, especially in the case of some infections. Splenectomy is a common clinical practice although asplenic individuals bear several hematological and immunological disorders.
Regardless of these facts, I would like to invite the immunologists and related researches to go deeper into the scientific questions about the role of spleen in physiological and pathological responses in each specific field.
References









Select your language of interest to view the total content in your interested language
Post your comment

Share This Article

Relevant Topics

Recommended Conferences

Article Usage

  • Total views: 11643
  • [From(publication date):
    July-2014 - Jul 23, 2017]
  • Breakdown by view type
  • HTML page views : 7861
  • PDF downloads :3782
 

Post your comment

captcha   Reload  Can't read the image? click here to refresh

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords