alexa Medicinal and Economic Values of Forest Products in the Treatment of Cancer in Southwest Nigeria

ISSN: 2329-6836

Natural Products Chemistry & Research

  • Research Article   
  • Nat Prod Chem Res 2017, Vol 5(7): 288
  • DOI: 10.4172/2329-6836.1000288

Medicinal and Economic Values of Forest Products in the Treatment of Cancer in Southwest Nigeria

Oluwakemi Osunderu*
Federal College of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
*Corresponding Author: Oluwakemi Osunderu, Federal College of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria, Tel: 09-7809339, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Aug 11, 2017 / Accepted Date: Aug 22, 2017 / Published Date: Oct 28, 2017

Abstract

Medicinal plants are used to address the twin problems of promoting sustainable livelihoods and treatment of numerous illnesses in Nigeria. The study examined the medicinal value of forest products in the treatment of cancer in South-west Nigeria. Primary data was obtained in a cross-section survey of 327 respondents comprising 127 Traditional Medicine Practitioners (TMPs), 100 Orthodox Medicine Practitioners (OMPs) and 100 respondents from the General Public drawn by multistage sampling technique from the study area. Interview schedule was used in collection of data on the effectiveness of forest products in cancer treatment. The result showed that seven species were identified belonging to seven different families; Rutaceae, Asteraceae, Anarcardiaceae, Annonaceae, Meliaceae, Guttiferaceae and Leguminaceae topped the TMPs priority list. Result of economic analysis shows minimal competition in the anti-cancer forest product market and a high level of monopoly with a Gini coefficient of 0.83. The rate of return on investment was 180.08% indicating that the TMPs were making profit. Five of the plants were tested against cancer cell lines MCF7 and Hs578T while Doxorubicin (a synthetic anticancer drug) was used as the control treatment. Three plants: Saccharum offinarum (Stem), Sucurinega virosa (Root) and Piper guineensii (Seed) produced no result; Garcinia kola (Bark) did not exhibit any anticancer effect even at a concentration of 10 μ1/m1 while only one plant species was effective against the cancer cell line at 1 μ1/m1. It is therefore concluded that forest products are effective in the treatment of cancer.

Keywords: Medicinal plants; Cancer; Traditional medicine practitioners; Forest products; Southwest Nigeria

Introduction

Medicinal plants are important for a number of reasons. A large proportion of the world’s rural population depends on these plants for their health care needs [1]. They also provide the basic raw material for the production of traditional medicines [2,3]. The collection and processing of medicinal plants provide employment and income opportunities for a large number of people in rural areas [4]. The importance of traditional medicinal plants in conservation of biological diversity also merits attention [5].

WHO has been conducting studies on medicinal plants. These studies prompted the initial identification of 20000 species of medicinal plants and a more detailed investigation of a short list of 200 [6]. A great number of these plants have their origins in the world's tropical forests and their present use is largely rooted in traditional medicines which play a major part in maintaining the health and welfare of both rural and city dwellers in developing countries [7,8].

More than 60% of world’s total new annual cases occur in Africa, Asia and Central and South America. These regions account for 70% of the world’s cancer deaths. It is expected that annual cancer cases will rise from 14 million in 2012 to 22 million within the next two decades [9,10]. Consequently, there is need to institute measures that will ensure the availability of anticancer forest products in the forest of Southwest Nigeria and ensure the sustainability of the practice of the TMPs who use forest products to treat cancer.

It has been estimated that as many as 75% to 90% of the world’s rural people rely on herbal traditional medicine as their primary health care [6] and this is a source of income for the growers of such plants and the TMPs [11]. African flora is potential for new compounds with pharmacological activities. Such efforts have led to the isolation of several biologically active molecules that are in various stages of development as pharmaceuticals.

The main objective of this study is to evaluate the economic and medicinal value of forest products in the treatment of cancer in southwest Nigeria, particularly Ogun State and the specific objectives are:

1. To determine the availability of medicinal plants used for the treatment of cancer in Southwest Nigeria.

2. To determine the efficacy of some of the forest products used for the treatment of cancer in Southwest Nigeria.

3. To investigate the stakeholders’ socioeconomic characteristics and their involvement in the usage of forest products for the treatment of cancer in Southwest Nigeria.

4. To determine the factors that affect the income of the TMPs in the study area and the market structure of forest products used for the treatment of cancer in Southwest Nigeria.

Sampling Method, Sample Selection and Data Collection

Data sources and collection

For the purpose of data collection in this study, field trips, collection of available medicinal plant species used for the treatment of cancer, determination of their species type, oral interviews of Traditional Medicine Boards officials, administration of structured questionnaires on relevant target groups, that is, Traditional Medicine Practitioners (TMPs), Orthodox Medicine Practitioners (OMPs) and the General Public (GP) were carried out. Ethno medicinal surveys were also conducted in the study area for collection of data related to the medicinal use of forest products in the treatment of cancer in addition to the pharmacological screening of the plants to determine the level of their efficacy in the treatment of cancer and to validate the claims of the TMPs. To identify the locations with high concentration of TMPs in the Study Area, primary data were obtained through oral interviews of the officials of the Hospital Management Department of the Federal Ministry of Health, Federal college of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (FEDCAM), Abuja and the Nigeria Natural Medicine Development Agency, Lagos. Multistage sampling technique was employed. The South-Western Nigeria was first stratified into six states to produce primary units namely: Ekiti, Lagos, Ogun, Ondo, Osun and Oyo. Out of these primary units, Ogun State was purposively sampled because of the high concentration of TMPs in the State (Figure 1).

natural-products-chemistry-Southwest-Nigeria

Figure 1: Map of Southwest Nigeria. Inset: Lagos and Ogun States.

Results

Availability of medicinal plants used for the treatment of cancer in South-Western Nigeria

Thirty-eight species of Medicinal Plants were identified from the information supplied by the TMPs. Table 1 shows the distribution of the species in relation to the source, availability status, parts of the plant used, form of the plant used, products and the species regeneration in the study area.

S/No Local Name Species Family Floral Type Source Status of Availability Parts used Form used Products
1 Eru Xylopia aethiopica
(Dunal) A. Rich
Annonaceae Tree Free areas Abundant Fruit, branches Greendry (Water boiled) Firewood, Medicinal
2 Oganwo Khaya ivorensisA. Chev. Meliaceae Tree Free areas Rare Stem, Branches
Bark
Dry Firewood, Medicinal
3 Mango Magnifera indicaLinn. Anacardiaceae Fruit Tree Free areas, Forest, plantation Abundant Leaves, fruits, bark, branches, stem Greendry (Water boiled) Fruit, firewood, medicinal
4 Kaju Anacardium occidentalisLinn Anacardiaceae Fruit Tree Free areas, Farmland, forest, plantation Abundant Fruits, branches, stem Green, dry (Water boiled) Fruit, firewood, medicinal
5 Iyeye Spondias mombinLinn. Anacardiaceae Fruit Tree Farmland, Free areas, forest Abundant Fruits, bark Green, dry (Water boiled) Fruit, medicinal
6 Abo AnnonasenegalensisPers Annonaceae Shrub Free areas, forest Abundant Leaves, fruits, stem Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal, fruit, firewood
7 Ahun Alstoniaboonei
De Wild
Apocynaceae Tree Free areas, forest Scarce Leaves, bark, root Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal, firewood
8 Osanwewe Citrus medicaLinn. Rutaceae Shrub Free areas, forest Abundant Leaves Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal
9 Oruwo MorindalucidaBenth. Rubiaceae Tree Free areas, forest Abundant Leaves Green, dry (Cold water squeezed) Medicinal
10 Oori-nla VitexdonianaSweet Verbenaceae Tree Free areas, forest Abundant Fruit, leaves Green, dry (Water boiled) Fruit, medicinal
11 Osopupa EnantiachloranthaOliv. Annonaceae Tree Free areas, forest Abundant Bark Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal
12 Owu-elepa PiliostigmathinningiMilne Redhead Leguminosae Sub: Mimosoidae Shrub Free areas, forest Abundant Leaves Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal
13 Putu Ricinodendronheudelotii(Baill) Euphorbiaceae Tree Free areas, forest Abundant Leaves, bark Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal
14 Opoto FicussurForssk. Moraceae Tree Free areas, forest Abundant Fruit, bark Green, dry (Water boiled) Fruit, medicinal
15 Asasa Margaritariadiscoidea(Baill.) Euphorbiaceae Tree Free areas, forest, dry outliers Scarce Leaves, branches, stem, bark, roots Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal, firewood
16 Dongoyaro AzadirachtaindicaA. Juss Meliaceae Tree Free areas, plantation Abundant Leaves, branches, stem Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal, firewood
17 Atare AfromomumeleguataLindl. Zingiberaceae Shrub Forest area, forest Abundant Fruits Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal
18 IgiFrutu TerminaliacatappaLinn Combretaceae Tree Forest area, forest Abundant Leaves, fruit, branches, stem Green, dry (Water boiled) Fruit, medicinal, firewood
19 Apa Afzeliaafricana (Smith) Sm. Leguminosae Sub: Caesalpinioideae Tree Forest area, forest Scarce Branches, stem, bark, root Green, dry (Powder) Medicinal, firewood
20 Oboo Erythrophleumsuaveolens(Gull. and Perr.) LeguminosaeSub: Caesalpinioideae Tree Forest Scarce Leaves, branches, stem, bark, root Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal, firewood
21 Asofeyeje RauvolfiavomitriaAfzel Apocynaceae Tree Free areas, forest Abundant Leaves, fruit, bark, root Green, dry(Powder) Medicinal
22 Omo CordiamilleniiBak. Bignoniaceae Tree Free areas, forest Scarce Leaves, branches, stem Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal, firewood
23 Ewuro Vernoniaamygdalina(Schreb) Del. Asteraceae Tree Free areas, forest Abundant Leaves, branches, bark, root Green, dry (Juice) Medicinal, chew-stick
24 Ope ElaeisguinensisG. Don. Palmae Palm Tree Swampy areas, forest Abundant Frond, exudate, bark Green, dry (Water boiled) Basket, palm
25 Iya Danielliaoliveri Rolfe Leguminosae Sub: Caesalpinioideae Tree Savannah forest, re-growth Abundant Branches, stem, bark, root Green, dry (Powder, Juice) wine, Firewood, medicinal
26 Ataile Zingiberofficinale Rossae. Zingiberaceae Herb Free areas, forest Abundant Rhizome Green, dry (Powder) Medicinal
27 Ayan Distemonanthusbenthamianus Benth Leguminosae Sub: Caesalpinoideae Tree Forest Abundant Leaves, branches, stem, bark, root Green, dry (Water boiled) Firewood, chew stick medicinal
28 Osankotu Sidaacuta Malraceae Herb Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Leaves, branches, stem, root Green, dry (Water boiled) Medicinal
29 Tana’poso Mirabilis nyctaginea Nyctaginaceae Herb Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Leaves, branches, stem, root Green, dry (Powder) Medicinal
30 Orin Ata Zanthoxylumzanthoxyloides Rutaceae Herb Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Branches, stem, bark, root Green, dry (Powder) Medicinal chew stick
31 Imiesu Agerantumconyzoides Compositae Shrub wild Abundant Leaves, branches, stem, root Green, dry (Juice) Medicinal
Insecticide
Animal Feed
32 Ayu Allium sativum Linn Liliaceae Rhizome Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Leaves Green, dry (Powder) Medicinal
33 Sun
Flower
Helianthus annuus Asteraceae Shrub Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Leaves, stem Green, dry (Powder) Medicinal
34 Ewe Akintola Securinegavirosa Euphorbiaceae Shrub Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Leaves, stems, root Green dry (Water boiled) Medicinal
35 Ori Vitellariaparadoxa Sapotaceae Tree Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Fruit Green, dry (Lotion) Medicinal
36 Ireke Saccharum
officinarum
Poaceae Shrub Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Leaves, stems, roots Juice Medicinal
37 Kanafuru Piper guineensis Piperaceae Shrub Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Leaves, stems, roots, fruits Green, dry (Powder) Medicinal
38 Orogbo Garcinia koli Guttiferae Tree Forest\wild, cultivate Abundant Fruits, Leaves Green, dry (Powder) Food

Table 1: List of plants used by the traditional medicine practitioners in the treatment of cancer. Estimated cost range=500-10,000 Naira/kg.

Table 1 shows that majority of the TMPs source their medicinal plants from free areas and rarely cultivate them. Table 1 shows that some of the plants are already scarce and species regeneration is by wilding. The Nigerian ecosystems are at greater risk of extinction if urgent attention is not given to the cultivation of medicinal plants [12,13]. Table 1 shows that 90% of the TMPs use the whole plant for treatment that is, they make use of the fruits, stems, barks and leaves at the same time. Table 1 also shows that the forest products used for the treatment of cancer are multipurpose; they are used as firewood, medicine, foods, chewing sticks and animal feeds (Agerantum conyzoides ). This corroborate the works of Adekunle [14].

Table 2 projects the second objective of this work, it shows that 90% of the TMPs use the green and dry forms of the forest products; afterwards they use water to soak or boil them. Also, using water the TMPs make juices from plants like Citrus medica, Morinda lucida, Vernonia amygdalina, Sida acuta and Agerantum conyzoides . Table 2 shows that 65% of the TMPs administer their medications twice daily while 23% of the TMPs adopt the thrice daily dosage. This helps to ensure frequent interactions and effective communication between the TMPs and their clients unlike the orthodox physicians [15-17]. Weekly wash is employed by 14% of the TMPs.

S.NO Name of Plant Species Form Used Method of Usage No of times taken
1 Eru Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich Fresh and dry forms By boiling in water for drinking 2ce.Daily
2 Oganwo KhayaivorensisA. Chev. Dry By boiling in water for drinking 3ce. Daily
3 Mango MagniferaindicaLinn. Green, fresh and dry Juicing with cold water 2ce.Daily
4 Kaju AnacardiumoccidentalisLinn Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 3ce. Daily
5 Iyeye SpondiasmombinLinn. Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 3ce. Daily
6 Abo AnnonasenegalensisPers Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking and bathing 3ce. Daily
7 Ahun Alstoniaboonei De Wild Green, dry By boiling in water for bathing 2ce.Daily
8 Osanwewe Citrus medicaLinn. Green, dry By boiling in water, Juice 2ce.Daily
9 Oruwo MorindalucidaBenth. Green, dry By boiling in water, Cold water squeezed 2ce.Daily
10 Oori-nla VitexdonianaSweet Green By boiling in water for drinking 3ce. Daily
11 Osopupa EnantiachloranthaOliv. Green, dry By boiling in water, soaking in cold water 2ce.Daily
12 Owu-elepa PiliostigmathonningiMilne Redhead Green, dry (Water boiled) By boiling in water for drinking 3ce. Daily
13 Putu Ricinodendronheudelotii(Baill) Heckel Green, dry soaking in cold water 3ce. Daily
14 Opoto FicussurForssk. Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking Weekly wash
15 Asasa Margaritariadiscoidea(Baill.) Webster Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 2ce. Daily
16 Dongoyaro AzadirachtaindicaA. Juss Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking and bathing 2ce.Daily
17 Atare AfromomumeleguataLindl. Green, dry By boiling in water, mixing with pap. 2ce.Daily
18 IgiFrutu TerminaliacatappaLinn Green, dry Ground, boiling in water for drinking and bathing 2ce.Daily
19 Apa Afzeliaafricana(Smith) Sm. Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking and bathing Weekly Wash
20 Oboo Erythrophleumsuaveolens(Gull. and Perr.) Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking and bathing 2ce.Daily
21 Asofeyeje RauvolfiavomitriaAfzel Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 2ce.Daily
22 Omo CordiamilleniiBak Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 2ce.Daily
23 Ewuro Vernoniaamygdalina(Schreb) Del Green, dry By boiling in water, Juicing Once Daily
24 Ope ElaeisguinensisG. Don Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 2ce.Daily
25 Iya DanielliaoliveriRolfe Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 2ce.Daily
26 Ataile ZingiberofficinaleRossae Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 2ce.Daily
27 Ayan DistemonanthusbenthamianusBenth Green, dry Heating Weekly Wash
28 Broom weed Sidaacuta Green, dry By boiling in water, Juicing 2ce Daily
29 Tana’poso Mirabilis nyctaginea Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 2ce Daily
30 Fagara Zanthoxylumzanthoxyloides Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 2ce Daily
31 Goat Weed Agerantumconyzoides Green, dry By boiling in water, Juicing for drinking 2ce Daily
32 Garlic Allium sativum Linn Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 2ce Daily
33 Sun
Flower
Helianthus annuus Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking 3ce. Weekly
34 Bush Weed Securinega virosa Green, dry By boiling in water for drinking and bathing 2ce Daily
35 African Shea Butter Vitellaria paradoxa Green Processed into lotion to rub on affected parts of the body 2ce Daily
36 Sugar Cane Saccharum offinarum Fresh, Green Juice 2ce Daily
37 African pepper Piper guineeensis Green, dry Adjunct to other preparation 2ce Daily
38 Bitter Kola Garcinia koli Green, dry, wet form By boiling in water and chewing 2ce Daily

Table 2: The form and method of usage by the traditional medicine practitioners in the treatment of cancer.

Inferential statistics results for TMPs in Southwest Nigeria

Inferential Statistics is used to further achieve objectives three and four. Table 3 is the result of the regression analysis showing the relationship between the profit of the Traditional Medicine Practitioners (TMPs) and their demographic data. Three (3) functional forms of production model including linear, semi-log and Cobb- Douglas (double-log) functions were fitted for the regression analysis. This was done to select the function which gave the result with the best fit. The estimated functions were evaluated in terms of the statistical significance of the coefficient of multiple determination (R2) as indicated by F value, the significance of the coefficients and the magnitude of the standard errors. The R2 is the coefficient of multiple determinations which measures the extent to which the variation in the dependent variable is explained by the explanatory variables. The F-value measures the goodness of fit of the model. Based on these statistical and economic criteria, Cobb-Douglas functional form was selected as the lead equation. The coefficient of multiple determination (R2) obtained for the Cobb-Douglass, that is, 0.437 shows that 43.7% of the variation in the profit of the TMPs were explained by the included explanatory variables, while the remaining 56.3% unexplained was due to the variables not included in the model which was the error term. Number of patients received, total cost of production, age of the practitioners and their years of experience are the significant factors influencing the profit of the practitioners; each of these variables has positive sign, which suggests that an increase in these variables would lead to an increase in the profit of the practitioners.

S. No Variables Linear Model Semi-log Model Double log Model
 1 (Constant) -191634 (-0.863) -6120497.800***
(-7.560)
3.015***
-7.52
 2 Number of Patients Received 5668.860**
-2.046
1.154*
-1.671
0.102**
-2.218
 3 Total Cost of Production 0.781***
-3.659
724844.917***
-5.356
0.321***
-4.627
 4 Age 12712.758***
-2.77
1351390.068***
-3.144
0.614***
-2.954
 5 Years of Experience 17349.115**
-2.108
821488.191**
-2.373
1.134*
-1.837
 6 State of Origin 0.989
(-0.151)
0.976
(-0.335)
1.052
-0.689
 7 Occupation 1.041
-0.559
1.03
-0.415
1.015
-0.219
 8 Gender 1.048
-0.647
1.022
-0.307
1.036
-0.5
 9 Marital Status 1.073
-0.969
1.091
-1.177
1.094
-1.268
 10 Religion 1.015
-0.216
1.009
-0.217
1.052
-0.745
 11 Educational Level 0.89
(-1.643)
0.918
(-1.227)
0.918
(-1.264)
12  R2 0.404 0.394 0.437
 13 Adjusted R2 0.385 0.379 0.423

Dependent Variable: Profit

*** - significant at 1% level

**- significant at 5% level

*- significant at 10% level

Computed t-values in parenthesis

Table 3: Regression analysis result to determine demographic factors that affect the profit of the Traditional Medicine Practitioners.

Table 4 gives the regression analysis result showing the relationship between the profit of the Traditional Medicine Practitioners (TMPs) and some selected variables other than the demographic data of the practitioners. Number of patients per year, duration of treatment, remedy shelf-life, daily application, and time of harvest are shown to have significant positive influence on the profit of the TMPs, which suggests that an increase in these variables would lead to an increase in the profit of the TMPs. However, number of people referred is shown to have a significant negative influence on the profit suggesting that the more that number of people referred by the TMPs the lesser their profits just as it would be expected.

Variables                    Coefficients t-values
Constant                      -2E+07 2.526**
Number of patients treated    41022.6 1.331
Number of relatives affected 5605.06           0.051
Number of people dead          -49103 -0.354
Number of patients per year  506017            2.106*
Number of people referred    -531374           2.514**
Duration of treatment            1283050          2.761**
Remedy shelf-life        246732            2.676**
Method of production 762933            1.599
Daily Application         793581            2.018**
Time of Harvest          1369993          3.450***

Dependent Variable: Profit

***-significant at 1% (p<0.01) level

**-significant at 5% (p<0.05) level

*-significant at 10% (p<0.1) level

Table 4: Regression analysis showing relationship between some selected factors and the profits of the Traditional Medicine Practitioners.

Table 5 is the result of the t-test analysis showing comparison of some selected parameters of the Traditional Medical Practitioners (TMPs) and the Orthodox Medical Practitioners (OMPs). The result shows that there is significant difference in the number of patients recovered, number of deaths recorded, number of referral and the cost of production between the two groups of practitioners with the mean values estimated as follows: number of patients recovered-TMPs (11.92), OMPs (1.99); number of deaths recorded-TMPs (1.75), OMPs (6.61); number of referral-TMPs (3.32), OMPs (8.26) and cost of production-TMPs (N17, 246.58), OMPs (N106, 750.00). However, the result shows that there is no significant difference in the number of patients treated by the two groups of practitioners (Figure 2).

natural-products-chemistry-Gini-Curve

Figure 2: Gini Curve.

Variables TMPs (Mean Values) OMPs (Mean Values) t-values  
Number of Patients Treated 16.13 19.02 1.106  
Number of Patients Recovered 11.92 1.99 6.110**  
Number of Deaths Recorded 1.75 6.61 6.096**  
Number of Referral 3.32 8.26 2.129*  
Cost of Treatments 17246.6 106750 6.530**  

**Significant at 1% (p<0.01) level

*Significant at 5% (p<0.05) level

Table 5: t-Tests analysis comparing some selected variables from the Traditional Medicine Practitioners (TMPs) and the orthodox medical practitioners (OMPs).

Result of the economic analysis shows minimal competition in the anti-cancer forest product market and a high level of monopoly with a Gini coefficient of 0.83. Net profit was N650,769.98 (Table 6). Table 7 also shows Rate of Return (280.08%) and the Rate of Return on Investment (180.08%)indicating that the TMPs are making profit.

Item Value
Total Revenue (TR) 1012143
Total Cost (TC) 361373
Net Profit(NP) 650770
Rate of Return (ROR) 280.08%
Rate of Return on Investment (RORI) 180.08%

Table 6: Annual Average Costs and Returns Analysis.

After three days of treatment
Con  0.738 0.785 0.765 0.693 0.74525 0.0398
Doxorubicin 0.661 0.666 0.638 0.642 0.65175 0.01382
Plant 1-10 μl/ml 0.759 0.728 0.77 0.719 0.744 0.02437
Plant 1-5 μl/ml 0.78 0.782 0.789 0.723 0.7685 0.03058
Plant 1-1 μl/ml 0.73 0.786 0.737 0.737 0.7475 0.02588
Plant 2-10 μl/ml 0.83 0.843 0.825 0.815 0.82825 0.01164
Plant 2-5 μl/ml 0.818 0.802 0.853 0.829 0.8255 0.02142
Plant 2-1 μl/ml 0.8 0.793 0.809 0.799 0.80025 0.0066

Table 7: Treatment of identified plants in comparison with Doxorubicin against breast cancer cell line (HS 578T).

Table 8 shows the test result against cancer cell lines Hs578T while Doxorubicin (a synthetic anticancer drug) was used as the control treatment. Garcinia kola (Bark) did not exhibit significant anticancer effect even at a concentration of 10 μ1/m1 while Erythropleum sauveoleons was effective against the cancer cell line at 1 μ1/m1.

After three days of treatment
Doxorubicin 0.933 0.921 0.902 0.91867 0.01563
Plant 1-10 μl/ml 1.035 0.985 1.02 1.01333 0.02566
Plant 1-5 μl /ml 1.005 0.964 0.893 0.954 0.05667
Plant 1-1 μl /ml 1.03 1.009 0.986 1.00833 0.02201
Plant 2-10 μl /ml 1.027 0.972 0.898 0.96567 0.06473
Plant 2-5 μl /ml 0.944 0.889 0.934 0.92233 0.0293
Plant 2-1 μl /ml 0.877 0.918 0.861 0.88533 0.0294
Doxorubicin 0.902 0.88 0.84 0.874 0.03143

Table 8: Treatment of identified plants in comparison with Doxorubicin against breast cancer cell line (MCF7).

Conclusion

Forest products are effective in treatment of cancer; therefore, in order to achieve the millennium development goals on health; there is need for government to ensure the uniformity of herbal medicine practices. Factors such as, sources and identity of the plant, physical characteristics, chemical constituents, the pharmacological and biological activities of the crude drug and method of preparation, uses and storage, amongst others, need to be identified and documented. This study has justified the importance of plant species in the maintenance of ecosystem and as a source of livelihood for man.

References

Citation: Osunderu O (2017) Medicinal and Economic Values of Forest Products in the Treatment of Cancer in Southwest Nigeria. Nat Prod Chem Res 5: 288. Doi: 10.4172/2329-6836.1000288

Copyright: © 2017 Osunderu O. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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