alexa Performance of the Assurance GDS® Assay for the Detection of L. monocytogenes in Pure Cultures and Spiked Food Samples | Open Access Journals
ISSN: 2476-2059
Journal of Food: Microbiology, Safety & Hygiene
Like us on:
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700+ peer reviewed, Open Access Journals that operates with the help of 50,000+ Editorial Board Members and esteemed reviewers and 1000+ Scientific associations in Medical, Clinical, Pharmaceutical, Engineering, Technology and Management Fields.
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on
Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business

Performance of the Assurance GDS® Assay for the Detection of L. monocytogenes in Pure Cultures and Spiked Food Samples

Denise Althaus, Claudio Zweifel, Sophia Johler and Roger Stephan*

Institute for Food Safety and Hygiene, Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

*Corresponding Author:
Roger Stephan
Institute for Food Safety and Hygiene Vetsuisse Faculty University of Zurich
Winterthurerstrasse 272 8057 Zurich, Switzerland
Tel: +41-44-635-8651
Fax: +41-44-635-8908
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: January 04, 2016; Accepted date: February 29, 2016; Published date: March 04, 2016

Citation: Althaus D, Zweifel C, Johler S, Stephan R (2016) Performance of the Assurance GDS® Assay for the Detection of L. monocytogenes in Pure Cultures and Spiked Food Samples. J Food Microbiol Saf Hyg 1:103. doi:10.4172/2476-2059.1000103

Copyright: © 2016 Althaus D, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Visit for more related articles at Journal of Food: Microbiology, Safety & Hygiene

Abstract

Listeria monocytogenes is afoodborne pathogen with significant impacts on public health and economy worldwide. Reliable and fast detection of L. monocytogenes is of major importance for both diagnostic laboratories and the food industry. The current study evaluated the performance of the Assurance GDS® assay for the detection of L. monocytogenes in pure culturesand spiked food samples. In the pure culture experiments, the Assurance GDS® assay for Listeria monocytogenesaccurately detected the target strains of different serotypesand was correctly negative for a variety of other Listeria species. For reliable detection of L. monocytogenes in pure culture experiments, colony counts >105 cfu/ml were required, which emphasizes the need for an adequate enrichment step. The challenge test experiments (steak tartare, bologna type sausage, Gorgonzola cheese) using a one-broth enrichment strategy showed that the Assurance GDS® assay reliably detected L. monocytogenes after 16 h of enrichment in Half-Fraser broth, provided that spiking levels of the different matrices were ≥102 cfu/g. Depending of the food matrix, longer incubation times of 24 h or 48 h were required when the initial spiking level was <102 cfu/g, as to be expected in a proportion of naturally contaminated food products. Thus, the Assurance GDS® Listeria monocytogenes assay has proven to be a reliable and easy to handle, rapid test system for the specific detection of L. monocytogenes. This system is a suitable tool for generating microbiological results used for a “positive batch release”, especially for RTE foods with short shelf lives. However, longer enrichment times (24 h or 48 h) are required in a one-broth enrichment strategy, when the contamination level of the food matrix is low (<102 cfu/g).

Keywords

Assurance GDS® detection system; Listeria monocytogenes ; Performance; Pure cultures; Spiked food samples; Enrichment times

Introduction

Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen that has significant impacts on public health and economy worldwide. L. monocytogenes belongs to the genus Listeria, which actually includes 18 further species: L. aquatica , L. booriae , L. cornellensis , L. denitrificans , L. fleischmannii , L. floridensis , L. grandensis , L. grayi , L. innocua , L. ivanovii , L. marthii , L. murrayi , L. newyorkensis , L. riparia , L. rocourtiae , L. seeligeri , L. weihenstephanensis, and L. welshimeri (http://www.bacterio.net). L. monocytogenes has the potential to cause serious and life-threatening conditions (including septicemia, meningitis, meningoencephalitis, and abortion) in persons with reduced immunity [1]. In the European Union, a total of 2.161 confirmed human cases of listeriosis (notification rate of 0.52 cases per 100.000 population) were reported in 2014 [2]. Ready-to-eat (RTE) foods seem to cause the majority of human L. monocytogenes infections and RTE products have also been implicated in large-scale outbreaks [3-6]. Listeria spp. are widely distributed in the environment and certain strains may become established and persist in the processing environment [7-9].

Detection of L. monocytogenes traditionally involves culture methods including selective enrichment and plating, followed by the biochemical identification of presumptive L. monocytogenes colonies. Using culture-based techniques, as e.g. ISO/EN 11290-1 [10], it takes up to one week until the identification is completed. However, there is a growing need for rapid tests generating results comparable to standard methods. Such rapid tests are of special importance for products with short shelf lives and (real-time) batch releases by food processing companies. Hence, several immunological and molecular biological methods have been developed [11]. Commercially available rapid molecular detection systems for L. monocytogenes or Listeria spp. include e.g. the Assurance GDS® assays, the GeneQuence® assay, the iQ-Check® kit, the Qualicon BAX® system, or the TaqMan® detection kit. The Assurance GDS® assay thereby combines the PCR approach with a preceding immunomagnetic separation (IMS) step [12,13]. The aim of the present study was (i) to determine the diagnostic specificity and sensitivity of the Assurance GDS® assay for L. monocytogenes and (ii) to evaluate the performance of this system for detection of L. monocytogenes in selected ready-to-eat food products using a one-broth enrichment strategy.

Materials and Methods

Specificity of the assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes assay

To determine the specificity of the Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes kit (Bio Control Systems, Bellevue, WA, USA), pure culture experiments were performed using a collection of seven L. monocytogenes strains (serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3a, 3c, 4b, O-group 4 non-motile) and 13 strains of various other Listeria species (Table 1). Strains originated from the collection of the Institute for Food Safety and Hygiene (University of Zurich, Switzerland) or were obtained from the Leibnitz Institute DSMZ (German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Braunschweig, Germany). Moreover, the serotype 3a L. monocytogenes strain was obtained from the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC, Vancouver, Canada). After growth of the 20 strains on sheep blood agar (overnight at 37°C; Oxoid, Pratteln, Switzerland), single colonies were inoculated into 10 ml of brain heart infusion broth (BHI; Oxoid) and incubated overnight (16 h) at 37°C. Colony counting (plate count agar, 24 h at 37°C; Oxoid) confirmed that this procedure yielded stationary phase cultures containing about 109 cfu/ml. Subsets of the incubated BHI broth cultures were tested using the Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes (Bio Control Systems) according to the manufacturers’ instructions.

Species Sero-type Straindesignation Assurance GDS®L. monocytogenes test resultsa
L. monocytogenes 1/2a N14-2420 +
L. monocytogenes 1/2b N14-2234 +
L. monocytogenes 1/2c N14-2232 +
L. monocytogenes 3a C23 FE8-1 +
L. monocytogenes 3c N14-0326 +
L. monocytogenes 4b N14-2079 +
L. monocytogenes 4-nmb N14-0600 +
L. aquatica    DSM 26686 -
L. cornellensis   DSM 26689 -
L. fleischmannii   DSM 24998 -
L. floridensis   DSM 26687 -
L. grandensis   DSM 26688 -
L. grayi   DSM 20601 -
L. innocua   DSM 20649 -
L. ivanovii   DSM 20750 -
L. riparia   DSM 26685 -
L. rocourtiae   DSM 22097 -
L. seeligeri   DSM 20751 -
L. weihenstephanensis   DSM 24698 -
L. welshimeri   ATCC 35897 -
aEach isolate was incubated for 16 h in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth at 37°C; + or – indicates a positive or negative test result; bO-group 4 non-motile.

Table 1: Specificity of the Assurance GDS assays for Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria species.

Detection limit of the Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes assay

For these experiments, stationary phase BHI broth cultures of the seven L. monocytogenes strains (prepared as outlined above; about 109 cfu/ml) were 10-fold serially diluted in saline solution (0.85%) to obtain 10 ml broth cultures containing approximately 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, and 108 cfu/ml. Subsets of each concentration and strain were then tested in triplicate using the Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes assay (Bio Control Systems) according to the manufacturers’ instructions.

Performance of the assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes assay in spiked food samples using a one-broth enrichment strategy

In the challenge test experiments, three ready-to-eat (RTE) food products were tested: steak tartare (dish from finely chopped or minced raw beef), bologna type sausage (traditional Swiss cooked sausage), and Gorgonzola cheese (veined Italian blue cheese). Tested food products were obtained from commercial retailers in Switzerland. In the laboratory, food samples were spiked with strain N14-2420 (L. monocytogenes serotype 1/2a). This strain was selected due to the frequent occurrence of serotype 1/2a strains in foods and their increasing proportion among human infections [14-18]. For each product type, three different spiking levels were used (104, 103, and <102 cfu/g). Spiked food samples (two for each spiking level and product type) were then enriched (25 g in 225 ml of Half-Fraser broth; Oxoid) for up to 48 h at 30C. After 16 h of incubation in Half-Fraser broth (Oxoid), the Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes assay (Bio Control Systems) was performed according to the manufacturers’ instructions. In the case of a negative result, the Assurance GDS® test was repeated after 24 h and 48 h of incubation. L. monocytogenes colony counts of the spiked food samples and the enrichment broths (after 16 h, after 24 h, and if necessary after 48 h) were determined using Chromogenic Listeria agar (48 h at 37C) supplemented with Listeria selective and differential supplement (Oxoid).

Results and Discussion

The Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes assay reliably detected all target strains in pure culture experiments, whereas isolates of other Listeria species yielded negative results (Table 1). Bosilevac et al. [12] reported for the first time specificity results for the Assurance GDS® test kit. However, in the present study, additional L. monocytogenes serotypes (3a and 3c) and a variety of recently described Listeria species (e.g. L. aquatica, L. cornellensis, L. fleischmannii, L. floridensis, L. grandensis, L. riparia, L. rocourtiae, L. weihenstephanensis) were also included.

To determine the detection limit of the Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes assay, 10-fold serial dilutions of the seven L. monocytogenes strains (pure cultures; concentrations: 103-109 cfu/ml) were tested in triplicate. Detailed evaluation results are shown in Table 2. With the exception of one run of the serotype 3c strain, the Assurance GDS® assay constantly detected the L. monocytogenes strains at concentrations ≥ 106 cfu/ml. A more heterogeneous picture was evident at 105 cfu/ml and 104 cfu/ml. Negative Assurance GDS® results in at least one run were observed at 105 cfu/ml for four strains and at 104 cfu/ml for six strains (four of them negative in two or three runs). At 103 cfu/ml, the Assurance GDS® assay did not detect any of the L. monocytogenes strains. Hence, concentrations >105 cfu/ml were required for reliable detection of L. monocytogenes using the Assurance GDS® system. This emphasizes the need for an adequate enrichment step (as specified by the manufacturer) when examining food products using this system.

  Serotype Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes test results at different concentrations (cfu/ml)
    109 108 107 106 105 104 103
N14-2420 1/2a +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/– +/–/– –/–/–
N14-2234 1/2b +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/– +/+/– –/–/–
N14-2232 1/2c +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/–/– –/–/– –/–/–
C23 FE8-1 3a +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ –/–/–
N14-0326 3c +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/– +/–/– –/–/– –/–/–
N14-2079 4b +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/– –/–/–
N14-0600 4-nmb +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/+/+ +/–/– –/–/–
aEach L. monocytogenes isolate was incubated for 16 h in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth at 37°C. After decimal serial dilution (109 to 103 cfu/ml), subsets of each concentration were tested in triplicate in the Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes assay; each + or – indicates a positive or negative test result; bO-group 4 non-motile.

Table 2: Detection of L. monocytogenes by the Assurance GDS® L. monocytogenes assay at different concentrations (cfu/ml).

For the challenge test experiments (steak tartare, bologna type sausage, Gorgonzola cheese; two different products of each type), RTE food samples were first spiked with the serotype 1/2a L.monocytogenes strain (three different initial spiking levels) and then enriched in Half-Fraser broth (for up to 48 h).

Other studies addressing the performance of the Assurance GDS® test system for detection of L. monocytogenes in food products are so far widely lacking. Kerr and Bright [19] evaluated the Assurance GDS® assays for detection of L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. in fish and seafood products by testing spiked and non-spiked samples after enrichment (for 18-22 h). These authors showed that the performance of the Assurance GDS® test systems were equivalent to the reference culture method, while being a much faster option.

In the present study, the Assurance GDS® assay reliably detected L. monocytogenes after 16 h of enrichment when the initial spiking level of the RTE food samples (steak tartare, bologna type sausage, Gorgonzola cheese) was between 102 and 104 cfu/g. The corresponding L. monocytogenes colony counts after 16 h of enrichment ranged from 5.4 x 105 to 9.8 x 107 cfu/ml in the enrichment broth (Table 3). On the other hand, the Assurance GDS® assay for L. monocytogenes yielded consistently negative results after 16 h of enrichment when the initial spiking levels were <102 cfu/g and the corresponding colony counts in the enrichment broth after 16 h <103 cfu/ml (Table 3). In these cases, incubation times of 24 h or even 48 h were required to obtain a positive Assurance GDS® test result. The corresponding L. monocytogenes colony counts (24 h or 48 h of enrichment and a positive Assurance GDS® test result) ranged from 1.5 x 103 to 3.0 x 105 cfu/ml. Thereby it must be considered that the L. monocytogenes counts on naturally contaminated (ready-to-eat) food products might vary widely, but frequently low contamination levels (<102 cfu/g) are expected [2,20-23].

Product/spiking level Assurance GDS® results and colony counts (cfu/ml) after enrichmenta
After 16 h After 24 h After 48 h
GDS cfu/ml GDS cfu/ml GDS cfu/ml
Tartareb
<102 cfu/g 1.9 x 102 + 2.7 x 104 nd nd
  1.9 x 102 1.5 x 104 + 3.0 x 105
103 cfu/g + 2.2 x 107 nd nd nd nd
  + 1.4 x 107 nd nd nd nd
104 cfu/g + 8.8 x 107 nd nd nd nd
  + 9.8 x 107 nd nd nd nd
Bologna type sausageb
<102 cfu/g 2.0 x 102 + 3.0 x 103 nd nd
  9.0 x 101 + 2.0 x 103 nd nd
103 cfu/g + 3.0 x 106 nd nd nd nd
  + 7.4 x 105 nd nd nd nd
104 cfu/g + 4.2 x 107 nd nd nd nd
  + 1.7 x 107 nd nd nd nd
Gorgonzolab
<102 cfu/g <102 na 2.0 x 102 + 4.2 x 104
  9.0 x 102 + 1.5 x 103 nd nd
103 cfu/g + 1.0 x 106 nd nd nd nd
  + 5.4 x 105 nd nd nd nd
104 cfu/g + 4.0 x 106 nd nd nd nd
  + 2.0 x 106 nd nd nd nd
aEnrichment in Half-Fraser broth for up to 48 h at 30°C; + or – indicates a positive or negative test result; nd: not determined; na: no amplification; bTwo different products were tested at each inoculation level.

Table 3: Results of the Assurance GDS® assay and colony counts after enrichment of food samples inoculated with L. monocytogenes (strain N14-2420, serotype 1/2a) in Half-Fraser broth.

Interestingly, one steak tartare sample showing 1.5 x 104 cfu/ml after 24 h of enrichment was still negative in the GDS® Assurance L. monocytogenes assay, whereas enriched bologna type sausage and Gorgonzola cheese samples yielded positive test results when colony counts in the enrichment broth were in the range of 1.5 x 103 to 4.2 x 104 cfu/ml (Table 3). A special challenge was thereby the examination of Gorgonzola cheese samples with initial spiking levels <102 cfu/g. The first two examined Gorgonzola samples yielded negative Assurance GDS® test results for L. monocytogenes even after 48 h of enrichment. Determination of colony counts showed the presence of a dominant Listeria spp. background flora, which hampered the growth of the spiked L. monocytogenes . Examinations were therefore repeated with two additional Gorgonzola samples that gave the results shown in Table 3.

Conclusion

In summary, the Assurance GDS® Listeria monocytogenes assay has proven to be a reliable and easy to handle, rapid test system for the specific detection of L. monocytogenes . This system is suited as a tool for generating microbiological results, which can be used for a “positive batch release” especially also for RTE foods with short shelf lives. However, in a one-broth enrichment strategy, depending of the food matrix, enrichment times of 24 h or 48 h are required when the initial contamination level of the food matrix is <102 cfu/g.

References

Select your language of interest to view the total content in your interested language
Post your comment

Share This Article

Relevant Topics

Recommended Conferences

Article Usage

  • Total views: 8163
  • [From(publication date):
    April-2016 - Aug 17, 2017]
  • Breakdown by view type
  • HTML page views : 8089
  • PDF downloads :74
 

Post your comment

captcha   Reload  Can't read the image? click here to refresh

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords