alexa Poor Oral Health in Late Life: Selected Predictors and Initiatives Towards Prevention of Tooth Loss | Open Access Journals
ISSN: 2167-7182
Journal of Gerontology & Geriatric Research
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700+ peer reviewed, Open Access Journals that operates with the help of 50,000+ Editorial Board Members and esteemed reviewers and 1000+ Scientific associations in Medical, Clinical, Pharmaceutical, Engineering, Technology and Management Fields.
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on
Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business

Poor Oral Health in Late Life: Selected Predictors and Initiatives Towards Prevention of Tooth Loss

Kristine Harrsen Bachkati*, Erik Lykke Mortensen, Henrik Brønnum-Hansen and Poul Holm-Pedersen

University of Southern, Denmark

*Corresponding Author:
Kristine Harrsen Bachkati
University of Southern, Denmark
Tel: +4535320719
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: January 30, 2017; Accepted date: February 15, 2017; Published date: February 17, 2017

Citation: Bachkati KH, Mortensen EL, Brønnum-Hansen H, Holm-Pedersen P (2017) Poor Oral Health in Late Life: Selected Predictors and Initiatives Towards Prevention of Tooth Loss. J Gerontol Geriatr Res 6:398. doi:10.4172/2167-7182.1000398

Copyright: © 2017 Bachkati KH, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Visit for more related articles at Journal of Gerontology & Geriatric Research

Abstract

The proportion of the population surviving to a very high age is increasing and the mortality among the oldest old is only half that is was 50 years ago, in the developed countries

Commentary

Commentary to the paper ‘Midlife cognitive ability, education, and tooth loss in older Danes

The proportion of the population surviving to a very high age is increasing and the mortality among the oldest old is only half that is was 50 years ago, in the developed countries [1]. This is a positive trend, but for preventive purposes it is important to identify risk factors for physical and cognitive impairment. Poor oral health is a common condition among the oldest old and can be a result of periodontal disease and dental caries. Tooth loss can result in pain and often lead to reduced quality of life, social isolation, and inadequate nutrition due to problems with chewing and swelling. Oral health diseases are more often seen in people with poorer cognitive ability [2], low education [3], and lower income [4]. These factors may associate to risk behaviors related to health beliefs and lifestyles, including dental care during the life course.

With the study ‘Midlife Cognitive Ability, education, and Tooth Loss in Old Danes’ we demonstrate the association between midlife cognitive ability and education (at ages 50 and 60) and late life tooth loss (at age 70).

Danish men and women (n=302) from the Glostrup 1914 Birth Cohort were included. Cognitive ability was assessed using Wechsler’s Adult Intelligence Scale at age 50 and 60. Information on education was gathered using a questionnaire at age 50 and 60. Clinical oral examination took place at age 70, and oral health was measured according to number of teeth.

Cognitive ability and educational attainment was as expected associated with number of teeth. Furthermore, the study revealed that an interaction between cognitive ability and educational attainment on number of teeth was highly significant. Those with higher cognitive ability tended to have higher educational attainment and these individuals had significantly lower odds for losing their teeth [5].

The findings in this study may relate to socioeconomic factors as well as other factors, and these remains to be studied.

Preservation of a healthy and well-functioning body and cognitive function is essential for maintaining the quality of life. Several western countries have preventive oral health programs for children, but programs or reimbursement possibilities for adults are not prioritized. Implementation of oral health promotion programs for adults are needed for facing the increased burden of oral diseases among older people and such programs should consider the increased risk associated of poor oral health with low cognitive ability and low education, physical as well as in terms of quality of life.

References

Select your language of interest to view the total content in your interested language
Post your comment

Share This Article

Relevant Topics

Recommended Conferences

Article Usage

  • Total views: 263
  • [From(publication date):
    April-2017 - Aug 22, 2017]
  • Breakdown by view type
  • HTML page views : 220
  • PDF downloads :43
 

Post your comment

captcha   Reload  Can't read the image? click here to refresh

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords