alexa
Reach Us +1-217-403-9671
Post-Harvest Life of Cut Chrysanthemum Cultivars in Relation to Chemicals, Wrapping Material and Storage Conditions | OMICS International
ISSN: 2376-0354
Journal of Horticulture
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700+ peer reviewed, Open Access Journals that operates with the help of 50,000+ Editorial Board Members and esteemed reviewers and 1000+ Scientific associations in Medical, Clinical, Pharmaceutical, Engineering, Technology and Management Fields.
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on
Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business

Post-Harvest Life of Cut Chrysanthemum Cultivars in Relation to Chemicals, Wrapping Material and Storage Conditions

Ranjan Srivastava*, Gunjan Sharma and Satish Chand
Department of Horticulture, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, India
Corresponding Author : Ranjan Srivastava
Department of Horticulture
G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology
Pantnagar, India, 263 145
Tel: 9412039911
E-mail: [email protected]
Received July 07, 2014; Accepted January 29, 2015; Published February 03, 2015
Citation: Srivastava R, Sharma G, Chand S (2015) Post-Harvest Life of Cut Chrysanthemum Cultivars in Relation to Chemicals, Wrapping Material and Storage Conditions. J Horticulture 2:123. doi:10.4172/2376-0354.1000123
Copyright: © 2015 Srivastava R. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Related article at
DownloadPubmed DownloadScholar Google

Visit for more related articles at Journal of Horticulture

Abstract

A study was conducted to examine the efficacy of chemicals, wrapping material and storage conditions on postharvest life of chrysanthemum cultivars Snowball Yellow and Snowball White. Vase life and flower quality were significantly influenced by chemicals, wrapping material and storage conditions. Minimum weight loss of spikes, maximum total water absorbed, flower diameter and vase life were obtained in treatment T2 (4% sucrose) as compared to control (Tap water). Significant effect of wrapping material and storage condition were also observed on per cent weight loss, total water absorbed maximum flower diameter and vase life in both the cultivars. Wrapping of spikes in PP 200 gauge with refrigerated storage at 3-4°C for 3 days + 6 hours of simulated transit (T₃Sâ‚‚) resulted in minimum percent weight loss, maximum total water absorbed, flower diameter and maximum vase life in both the cultivars.

Abstract
A study was conducted to examine the efficacy of chemicals, wrapping material and storage conditions on post-harvest life of chrysanthemum cultivars Snowball Yellow and Snowball White. Vase life and flower quality were significantly influenced by chemicals, wrapping material and storage conditions. Minimum weight loss of spikes, maximum total water absorbed, flower diameter and vase life were obtained in treatment T2 (4% sucrose) as compared to control (Tap water). Significant effect of wrapping material and storage condition were also observed on per cent weight loss, total water absorbed maximum flower diameter and vase life in both the cultivars. Wrapping of spikes in PP 200 gauge with refrigerated storage at 3-4°C for 3 days + 6 hours of simulated transit (TS) resulted in minimum percent weight loss, maximum total water absorbed, flower diameter and maximum vase life in both the cultivars.
Keywords
Chrysanthemum; Variety; Wrapping material; Storage; Chemicals; Vase life
Introduction
Cut flowers, in general, are highly perishable and chrysanthemums are no exception to it. The high perishability of flowers render them vulnerable to considerable post-harvest losses [1]. In view of market strategy for cut flowers in the country, there are problems of frequent market gluts and price crash. Hence, there is an urgent need to evolve an appropriate packaging and storage technique for cut flowers during periods of decline and also to facilitate long term sea-shipment for export. Postharvest handling involving packaging is imperative to maintain flower freshness and original colour of flower for a longer period which is chiefly governed by internal mechanism that includes balance between water uptake and water loss, stem plugging, respiration rate and production of toxic substances like ethylene and external factors that include environmental conditions and microbial attack on the cut ends. The vase life of cut flowers is influenced by variety of factors like climate, variety, harvesting time, post harvest handling etc. [1]. A wide range of floral preservatives in the form of germicides, ethylene antagonistics and source of energy (sucrose) are in use to preserve the flower quality and extending post harvest longevity of cut flowers. Post harvest management and value addition can increase prices of cut flowers up to 9-10 times. A variety of preservatives and temperature treatments have been advocated for extending the vase life of cut flowers of different varieties. However, such information on crop varieties growing under Tarai conditions is scanty. Therefore, the present investigation was undertaken to study the influence of chemicals, wrapping material and storage conditions on post harvest life of chrysanthemum.
Materials and Methods
The present investigation was carried out at Model Floriculture Centre of the University located at 29°N latitude, 79.3°E longitude in the Tarai belt of Himalayas. The experimental materials consist of chrysanthemum varieties Snowball Yellow (V1) and Snowball White (V2). The crop was raised under naturally ventilated poly house with uniform standard cultural practices. The stems were harvested with the help of sharp secateurs at 8:00 am in the morning when 50 per cent of flowers were about ¾th open in field. The stem length of all flowers were uniformly maintained i.e. 25 cm. The chemical preservatives used in the present study comprised of sucrose (2% and 4%), citric acid (100 ppm and 200 ppm) and 8-HQC (150 ppm and 200 ppm). Sucrose, a carbohydrate, was used as a carbon source of energy while citric acid and 8-HQC were used for their anti-bacterial properties. The cut stems were kept in different holding solutions, T0-Tap water (Control), T1-Sucrose (2%), T2-Sucrose (4%), T3-Citric acid (100 ppm), T4-Citric acid (200 ppm), T5-8-HQC (150 ppm), T6-8-HQC (200 ppm). The wrapping materials consists of T1-LDPE 100 gauge, T2-PP 100 gauge, T3-PP 200 gauge, T4-Cellophane, T5-Newspaper, T6-Brown paper, T7-Open (Control) with storage conditions S1-Normal storage conditions (25°C Temp.), S2-Storage under refrigerated conditions (3-4°C) + 6 hours of simulated transit, S3-Storage under refrigerated conditions (3-4°C) + 16 hours of simulated transit. The experiment was laid out in 2- factorial CRD with three replications. Observations like vase life, flower diameter, percent weight loss and maximum water absorbed were then recorded.
Results and Discussion
Post harvest characteristics of chrysanthemum cultivars were significantly affected by different chemical treatments, wrapping materials, storage conditions as well as varieties and their interaction. Minimum percent water loss, maximum flower diameter and maximum vase life of flowers were observed in the stems treated with sucrose 4% (T2) (Table 1). T2 recorded minimum per cent weight loss (33.12%) and it was found to be statistically at par with stems pulsed with sucrose (2%) (T) wherein per cent weight loss of 35.84% was recorded. Data further revealed that variety did not have any significant effect on per cent weight loss. As far as interaction is concerned, T2V1 recorded minimum (31.36%) per cent weight loss which was found to be statistically at par with T1V2 as well as T1V1 in which per cent weight losses of 35.42% and 36.26% were recorded, respectively. Minimum percent weight loss can be attributed to better water conductance through stem due to sucrose which was also utilized as the source of energy by cut flower stem and the germicidal properties of 8-HQC in addition to ethylene inhibition which might have helped in maximum uptake of water by the flowers, resulting in gain in fresh weight. The results obtained are also in close proximity with the findings of Park et al. [2]who recorded higher fresh weight of cut chrysanthemum spikes kept in a solution containing Al2(SO4)3 (250 ppm) and sucrose (3%). Among the different holding solutions, the larger flower diameter was observed in treatment T2 (Sucrose 4%). Irrespective of treatments, variety (V) recorded maximum average flower diameter (8.42 cm) which was significantly higher than the average maximum diameter recorded in variety (V1) (7.43 cm). In both the varieties, maximum flower diameter increased significantly over control in all the chemical treatments. Interaction data show that T2V2 produced maximum flower diameter (8.80 cm) while interaction T0V1 recorded minimum flower diameter.
(7.03 cm) attained in vase. Possible explanation for gain in flower diameter may be the maintenance of higher fresh weight by maximum water uptake as a result of avoidance of blockage of xylem tissues by 8-HQC and utilization of sucrose as source of energy by the cut flower stem. Moreover, the accumulation of carbohydrates and water uptake would have had direct effect on increase in the cell volume. Besides, sucrose availability might have facilitated higher rate of respiration necessary for cell division, cell enlargement and providing ‘C’ skeleton for the tissue structure contributing to flower expansion and formation of cell constituents and thus caused increase in petal size as observed by Ho and Nicholes [3] in rose corollas. All holding solutions significantly increased the vase life which ranged from 20.00 to 23.77 days and 18.33 to 36.33 days in different vase solutions in cultivars V1 and V2, respectively. However, when compared with all other chemical treatments, pulsing with sucrose (4%) (T2) recorded maximum vase life (26.83 days). Higher average vase life of 23.95 days was observed in V1 and interaction T2V1 recorded maximum vase life of 27.33 days. The enhanced longevity of sucrose pulsed stems could be attributed to continued and increased water uptake in the stems, cellular turgidity, enhanced fresh weight and dry weight, better petal size and optimum continuation of cell metabolism, specially respiration that facilitated cell growth and development, formation of cellular constituents and liberation of energy for other cellular function. While, the shortest vase life of flowers kept in distilled water could be correlated with decreased water uptake in cut stems due to microbes which stimulated the formation of vascular occlusions in the stem as advocated by Lineberger and Stepkonus [4].
Average percent weight loss, flower diameter and vase life were also significantly influenced by wrapping material and storage conditions in both the chrysanthemum cultivars. Among all the treatments used, stems wrapped in PP 200 gauge (T3) resulted in minimum post harvest percent weight loss (39.02%) in variety Snowball Yellow and (42.04%) in variety Snowball White. Stems stored in refrigerated condition (3-4°C) for 3 days and subjected to 6 hr simulated transit (S2) depicted minimum per cent weight loss in both the cultivars. Among the interactions, stems wrapped in PP 200 gauge and stored under refrigerated conditions (3-4°C) for 3 days and subjected to 6 hr simulated transit (T3S2) was found to be best in reducing the per cent weight loss in both the chrysanthemum cultivars. This may be due to the water loss which accounts for per cent physiological loss in weight was less when cut flowers were stored at lower temperature because vapour pressure deficit was smaller at lower temperature thereby causing less moisture as well as weight loss. Moreover, low cold storage temperature slows down transpirational loss of water and respirational loss of carbohydrates which reduces the loss of weight during storage. The results are in conformity with the findings of [5,6]. Similarly, both flower diameter and vase life were found to be maximum in treatment T3 when stored under refrigerated conditions (3-4°C) for 3 days and subjected to 6 hr in both Snowball Yellow and Snowball White (Tables 2 and 3). The interaction effect was found to be significant and maximum flower diameter attained (7.76 cm) in Snowball Yellow and (8.56 cm) Snowball White was reported in stems wrapped in PP 200 gauge and stored under refrigerated condition (3-4°C) for 3 days + 6 hr simulated transit (T3S2). This may be due to the fact that the flowers wrapped in polypropylene had higher moisture retention and further storing them at low temperature resulted in lower metabolic activities like respiration, transpiration and maintained high humidity which resulted in easy and more flower opening. Moreover, the beneficial effect of low temperature storage was due to the fact that it not only affects metabolic and physical activities of microbes but also reduces the rate of ethylene biosynthesis as well as the effectiveness of ethylene in promoting deteriorative processes that may lead to petal damage and shrinking. Similar findings were reported by Nowak and Rudnicki [7] and Singh et al. [8] in gladiolus.
References








Tables and Figures at a glance

image   image   image
Table 1   Table 2   Table 3
Select your language of interest to view the total content in your interested language
Post your comment

Share This Article

Recommended Conferences

Article Usage

  • Total views: 13189
  • [From(publication date):
    March-2015 - Nov 16, 2018]
  • Breakdown by view type
  • HTML page views : 9157
  • PDF downloads : 4032
 

Post your comment

captcha   Reload  Can't read the image? click here to refresh

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2018-19
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri and Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

+1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]m

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2018 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version