alexa Recovery from Schizophrenia with Bioactive Substances in Hericium erinaceum | Open Access Journals
ISSN: 2469-9837
International Journal of School and Cognitive Psychology
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700+ peer reviewed, Open Access Journals that operates with the help of 50,000+ Editorial Board Members and esteemed reviewers and 1000+ Scientific associations in Medical, Clinical, Pharmaceutical, Engineering, Technology and Management Fields.
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on
Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business

Recovery from Schizophrenia with Bioactive Substances in Hericium erinaceum

Inanaga K*

Chikusuikai Institute for Neuroinformation, Chikusuikai Hospital, Yame, Fukuoka, Japan

*Corresponding Author:
Kazutoyo Inanaga
Chikusuikai Institute for Neuroinformation
Chikusuikai Hospital, Yame, Fukuoka, Japan
Tel: +81 943-23-5131
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: July 16, 2015 Accepted Date: July 20, 2015, Published Date: July 25, 2015

Citation: Inanaga K (2015) Recovery from Schizophrenia with Bioactive Substances in Hericium erinaceum. Int J Sch Cog Psychol S1:003. doi:10.4172/2469-9837.S1-003

Copyright: © 2015 Inanaga K. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Visit for more related articles at International Journal of School and Cognitive Psychology

Abstract

Hericium erinaceum (HE; Lion’s Mane or “Yamabushitake” in Japanese) is a uniquemushroom for maintaining brain health and improving cognitive functions. Lion’s Mane is one of the edible mushrooms widely distributed in Japan and China. Several compounds extracted from HE exhibit neuro-protective activity in the brain.

Short Communication

Hericium erinaceum (HE; Lion’s Mane or “Yamabushitake” in Japanese) is a uniquemushroom for maintaining brain health and improving cognitive functions. Lion’s Mane is one of the edible mushrooms widely distributed in Japan and China. Several compounds extracted from HE exhibit neuro-protective activity in the brain [1].

Since early 1990s, Kawagishi and his colleagues have been investigating the role of the compounds derived from HE in the treatment of dementia. They found that HE exhibited important bioactive properties, including the induction of NGF synthesis, inhibition of the cytotoxicity of amyloide beta peptide, and protection against neuronal cell death caused by oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum stress.

Amyloban3399, [2] a product made of amycenone, a standardized extract of HE containing hericenones and amyloban is currently tested for safety as a health food supplement.

It has been reported that Amyloban3399 raises the level of mental alertness, encourages behaviors, improves mood and attentiveness to one’s surroundings, and thus, should increase learning and motivation, while promoting voluntary interactions with others.

Amyloban3399 was generally well torelated and its multifold clinical usefulness was demonstrated in sleep disorders, cognitive and anxiety disorders, depression and schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia is a mental illness, most devastating of the major psychoses and affecting approximately 1% of the population over the world [3].

I had reported a case of schizophrenia who recovered from schizophrenia with Amyloban3399. He is a 54-year-old man and was diagnosed as schizophrenia at the age of 18 years. In his twenties, he experienced auditory hallucinations and delusions. He was treated at a psychiatric Hospital as an outpatient and as an inpatient. He was prescribed the antipsychotic drugs such as chlorpromazine and haloperidol. He was extremely sensitive to antipsychotics and prone to developing side effects-he always experienced hypersalivation, perspiration, headaches, and acathisia as side effects [4].

At the age of 33 years, he also experienced negative symptoms such as anergia and he had water intoxication. At the age of 49 years, he experienced auditory hallucinations and delusion of guilt. He was admitted to C hospital. After discharge, he had malignant syndrome because of the abrupt withdrawal of his prescribed drugs.

At the age of 52 years, beginning on September 8, he was injected once two weeks with risperidon (Risperidon Consta) at 37.5 mg. He was prescribed quetiapine (200 mg) and flunitrazepam before going bed. He was discharged from the hospital on November 19.

After discharge, he habitually awoke at approximately 11:00 a.m., but felt drowsy and inactive during the day. On December 2, he began taking Amyloban3399,. He took 6 tablets daily with the aforementioned drugs.

Table 1 shows the change in the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), State-Trait

  Before Amyloban 3399 Afteryloban 3399
STAIState 80 35
Trait 80 29
PANSS 62 30

Table 1: Anxiety Inventory (STAI).

Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores before and two weeks after the administration of Amyloban3399.

On November 16(i.e, two weeks after he began taking Amyloban3399), his daily activity level markedly improved. Positive and negative symptoms were not observed.

His mother was impressed with her son’s marked improvement.She has never seen such good state for the last 35 years. One year after beginning Amyloban3399. he was prescribed mirtazapine (45 mg) and zotepine (5 mg) before bedtime. Since beginning this drug regimen, he has been completely well for these 4 years.

Carlsson et al. showed that one of the major problems of schizophrenia was the poor response of cognitive symptoms to available treatments, even when the positive symptoms showed improvements. It has been repeatedly observed in clinical trials that positive symptoms may be reduced over a 4-12 weeks period, but it can take months to see improvements in cognitive symptoms. Based on these observations, it is hypothesized that Amyloban3399 may be beneficial for treating primary cognitive deficits and negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

We have already reported on 10 schizophrenia patients, randomly selected  by  psychiatrist, working at six different psychiatric hospitals. All patients were refractory to currently available antipsychotic agents. After the use of Amyloban3399, they improved without exception and also without adverse reactions. Average scores on PANSS (positive and negative syndrome scale) improved significantly for all items, including positive, negative, and general psychopathology.

References

Select your language of interest to view the total content in your interested language
Post your comment

Share This Article

Recommended Conferences

Article Usage

  • Total views: 12153
  • [From(publication date):
    specialissue-2015 - Aug 22, 2017]
  • Breakdown by view type
  • HTML page views : 8272
  • PDF downloads :3881
 

Post your comment

captcha   Reload  Can't read the image? click here to refresh

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords