alexa
Reach Us +441414719275
Saponins from Genus Albizia: Phytochemical and Biological Review | OMICS International
ISSN: 2167-0412
Medicinal & Aromatic Plants
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700+ peer reviewed, Open Access Journals that operates with the help of 50,000+ Editorial Board Members and esteemed reviewers and 1000+ Scientific associations in Medical, Clinical, Pharmaceutical, Engineering, Technology and Management Fields.
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events with over 600+ Conferences, 1200+ Symposiums and 1200+ Workshops on Medical, Pharma, Engineering, Science, Technology and Business
All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal.

Saponins from Genus Albizia: Phytochemical and Biological Review

Singab AN*, Bahgat D, Sayed EAl and Eldahshan O
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain-Shams University, Cairo, 11566, Egypt
Corresponding Author : Singab AN
Department of Pharmacognosy,
Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, 11566
Cairo, Egypt
Tel: +2 02 2405 1120;
Fax: +2022405 1107;
E-mail: [email protected], [email protected]
Received June 12, 2015; Accepted June 24, 2015 ; Published June 29, 2015
Citation: Singab AN, Bahgat D, Sayed EAl, Eldahshan O (2015) Saponins from Genus Albizia: Phytochemical and Biological Review. Med Aromat Plants S3:001. doi:10.4172/2167-0412.S3-001
Copyright: © 2015 Singab AN, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Visit for more related articles at Medicinal & Aromatic Plants

Abstract

Albizia is a large genus that belongs to family Fabaceae; most of Albizia species are rich in triterpenoidal saponins. These species were used in folk medicine for the treatment of rheumatism, stomach ache, cough, diarrhea, wounds, and as an anthelmintic. Many pharmacological activities were reported for the fractions or extracts containing saponins. Also, various pharmacological activities were reported for the pure isolated saponins. This review focuses on the distribution of saponins among the different species of genus Albizia and their pharmacological activities.

Keywords
Albizia; Cytotoxicity; Echinocystic acid; Oleanolic acid
Abbreviations:
A549: Human Lung Epithelial cancer; A278: Human Ovarian Cancer; Bel-7402: Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BGC- 823: Human Gastric Cancer; B16-F10, SK-MEL-28: Melanoma Cells; HCT-8, HCT 116: Human Colon Cancer; HepG-2: Hepatocellular Carcinoma; HT-29: Human Colon Cancer; JMAR, MDA1986: Human Head and Neck Squamous Cells; KB: Oral carcinoma; MCF-7: Human Breast Adenocarcinoma
Introduction
Albizia is a large genus belonging to the family Fabaceae, which comprises about 150 species that are widely distributed in in Africa and Central South America. Most of these plants are fast-growing subtropical and tropical trees and shrubs. Phytochemical investigation of different Albizia species revealed the presence of different classes of secondary metabolites, such as saponins, terpenes, alkaloids and flavonoids, but most of the phytochemical studies done on different Albizia species lead to the isolation of saponins. Saponins are secondary metabolites of a glycosidic nature that are widely distributed among plant kingdom. The aglycon part maybe a steroidal or triterpenoidal nucleus which is attached to one or more sugar residues in a straight chain or a branched form, most often composed of D-glucose, L-rhamnose, D-galactose, D-glucuronic acid, L-arabinose, D-xylose or D-fucose. Saponins have been used extensively in drug-related industry due to their pharmaceutical properties; which has driven the emergence of new extraction technologies with the main purpose of optimizing the yield in order to accommodate their need [1].
Pharmacological activities of extracts containing saponins from different Albizia species
Anti-inflammatory activity: The aqueous ethanolic extract of A. amara roots exhibited significant anti-inflammatory effect in rats at dose of 200 mg/kg administrated compared to the standard dose of aspirin (100 mg/kg). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated using carrageenan- induced paw oedema where the percentage inhibition of oedema was 61.91% [2].
The aqueous ethanolic extract of A. lebbeck bark showed significant anti-inflammatory effect at dose of 400 mg/kg administrated to rats compared to the standard dose of indomethacin (10 mg/kg).The antiinflammatory effect was evaluated using carrageenan, dextran, and cotton pellet- induced paw oedema where the percentage inhibition of oedema was 59.57%, 52.93%, and 53.57%, respectively [3].
Analgesic activity: The aqueous ethanolic extract of A. amara roots showed analgesic effect at dose of 200 mg/kg administrated to rats compared to the standard dose of aspirin (100 mg/kg). The analgesic effect was evaluated using hot plate method test [2].
The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of A. lebbeck leaves revealed analgesic effect at doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg administrated to rats. The analgesic effect was evaluated using the hot plate test and tail flick method [4].
Nootropic and anxiolytic activity: The n-butanolic fraction of the methanolic extract of A. lebbeck leaves showed nootropic and anxiolytic activity at dose of 25 mg/kg administrated to albino mice. This effect was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test [5].
Anti-histaminic activity: The ethanolic extract of A. lebbeck stem bark inhibited histamine signaling in sensitized rats at a dose of 200 mg/ rat through suppression of H1 receptors and histidine decarboxylase genes (HDC) transcriptions [6].
Anti-microbial activity: The 70% aqueous ethanolic extract of A. ferruginea stem bark and leaves showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Aspergillus niger, and Penicillium notatum. The anti-microbial activity was evaluated by calculating zone of inhibition were the leaves extract was more active and P. aeruginosa was resistant to both extracts [7].
Anti-spermatogenic activity: Oral administration of 50 mg/kg of a saponin-rich fraction obtained from the A. lebbeck stem bark for 60 days to male rats led to decrease in the weights of testes, epididymides, seminal vesicle and ventral prostate also the production of round spermatid was reduced by 73.04% [8]. Pharmacological activity wasn’t only evaluated on extracts containing saponins, but it was also evaluated on pure isolated saponins. Table 1 and Figures 1-7 shows the distribution of saponins among different Albizia species and their pharmacological activities.
Results and Discussion
Plants of the genus Albizia have been used in the traditional medicine worldwide for the treatment of rheumatism, stomach ache,and cough, diarrhea, for wound- healing and as an anthelmintic. In traditional Indian and Chinese medicine, Albizia plants have been used to treat insomnia, irritability, wounds, tuberculosis, as anti-dysenteric and as antiseptic.
Literature revealed that Albizia is rich in triterpenoidal saponins in which the aglycon part may be oleanolic acid, echinocystic acid, acacic acid lactone or machaerinic acid γ-lactone while the sugar residue may be arabinose, xylose, rhamnose, fucose, glucose or 2-acetamido-2- deoxy glucose.
Most of these saponins have been reported to have cytotoxic activity on different cell lines, which highlights the importance of performing more in-depth studies in order to know the mechanism of the cytotoxic activity of these saponins and the structure activity relationship. Also, many extracts of different species of genus Albizia have been reported to have many pharmacological activities, such as antimicrobial activity of A. ferrugenia [9] and A.lebbeck [10], Antidiabetic activity of A.odoratissima [11], and anti-depressant activity of A. julibrissin [12].Therefore, further studies are required to determine whether these pharmacological activities are attributed to saponins or not [13-22].
References

Tables and Figures at a glance

Table icon
Table 1

 

Figures at a glance

Figure Figure Figure Figure
Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4

 

Figure Figure Figure
Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7
Select your language of interest to view the total content in your interested language
Post your comment

Share This Article

Relevant Topics

Article Usage

  • Total views: 13109
  • [From(publication date):
    specialissue-2015 - Jun 26, 2019]
  • Breakdown by view type
  • HTML page views : 9224
  • PDF downloads : 3885
Top