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The World We Live in | OMICS International
2169-026X
Journal of Entrepreneurship & Organization Management
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The World We Live in

Haron AJ*

Higher Colleges of Technology, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

*Corresponding Author:
Haron AJ
Higher Colleges of Technology
Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
Tel: +971 2 681 4600
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: December 05, 2014; Accepted Date: January 05, 2015; Published Date: January 13, 2015

Citation: Haron AJ (2015) The World We Live in. J Entrepren Organiz Manag 4:125. doi: 10.4172/2169-026X.1000125

Copyright: © 2015 Haron AJ. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Abstract

The papers discusses the effect of demography on world communication, the effect of Food on world security, the effect of the natural environment on food supplies, the effect of energy supplies on world security and finally the effect of technology on the natural environment. In the spirit of full disclosure, the author of the paper would like to confess that he is a bit of a pessimist and this will be reflected in his writing. Nature is cyclical and since humans are part of nature, we also behave in a cyclical fashion; we make extreme, shortsighted, and self-serving decisions only to realize that we were wrong and spend much more time and resources fixing the mistake than it took to make it in the first place. Therefore, excuse us if this seems to be a recurrent theme throughout the paper.

Keywords

Demography; world communication; world security; environment; food supplies.

Introduction

This paper will discuss the ramifications of interactions of certain areas of our world with other areas, and reflect on the ways these interactions are affecting the trajectory of our future and how it will influence the decisions we will make to either fix future mistakes or take advantage of future opportunities.

The papers discusses the effect of demography on world communication, the effect of Food on world security, the effect of the natural environment on food supplies, the effect of energy supplies on world security and finally the effect of technology on the natural environment. In the spirit of full disclosure, the author of the paper would like to confess that he is a bit of a pessimist and this will be reflected in his writing. Nature is cyclical and since humans are part of nature, we also behave in a cyclical fashion; we make extreme, shortsighted, and self-serving decisions only to realize that we were wrong and spend much more time and resources fixing the mistake than it took to make it in the first place. Therefore, excuse us if this seems to be a recurrent theme throughout the paper.

Demography effects world communication in an extreme manner, Eberstadt argues that demographics has an effect on world communication, world affairs, the global alignment of power, and even the conduct of global relations may appear entirely self-evident. We barely need demographers to communicate such an insight to us. With all things being equal, a country with a great population will be capable of assembling greater resources to champion its foreign policy objectives than a smaller country [1]. This is obvious when we look at the impact of nations such as India and China on the world communication and culture [2].

The dynamic exchanges between and within the bio-geophysical and human environments lead to the manufacture, processing, delivery, preparation, and ingesting of food, resulting in food systems that underpin food security [3]. Such stresses might be prompted by a range of factors in addition to climate change and/or other agents of environmental change (e.g. war, AIDS etc.) and may be predominantly severe when these factors act in combination. Urbanization and globalization are causing rapid changes to food systems.

All of these reasons are combining to undermined security in many of the world’s regions, and forcing many political and climate change refugees to flee their home countries and seek refuge in other areas, further exacerbating the national security of those countries. We can see this happening in many places, like illegal immigration to the US from south and Central America, refugees crossing the Mediterranean to Europe [4].

Severe changes in the natural environment affect cultivation and food production in multifaceted ways [3]. It affects food production directly through fluctuations in agro ecological circumstances and indirectly by affecting development and circulation of incomes, and therefore demand for agricultural produce. Influences have been measured in many studies and under various sets of expectations [5].

According to Kiriyama and Kajikawa, energy, security is regarded as one of the chief aims of energy policy parallel with economic efficiency and environmental safeguards. Nevertheless, since it includes a variety of implications, energy security has been signified as a measure with indicators to fit political contexts. For instance, geopolitical deliberations have been essential in supporting renewable energy in several countries, to reduce dependence on imports of fossil fuels; furthermore, this will reduce the likelihood of world conflicts over energy, as is obviously apparent in most wars thought-out history [6].

Lastly, in order to achieve positive benefits from a more knowledge intensive economy, many developing countries have highlighted enhancements in their science and technology S&T capabilities [7]. China, for example, has been undergoing acceleration in its R&D strength. However, this will result in higher capital investment and economic growth; a replacement of energy for other aspects of production; greater energy consumption by households and at least 1500 industrial enterprises and thousands of factories in China alone [8]. This paper shows the significance of considering the economy wide implications of a technology strategy, distinguishing that better technology does not automatically imply a cleaner environment [8].

Conclusions

From the above study it is concluded that developing countries have underlined the improvement in the science and technology especially China. This will result in higher capital investment and economic growth. This shows that significance improvement in economy wide applications of technology was observed when distinguished from new better technology.

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