alexa Zebra Mussel Byssus Discs Detaching from Biofilm Coated Substratum
ISSN: 2376-0214
Journal of Biodiversity, Bioprospecting and Development
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  • J Biodivers Biopros Dev 2015, Vol 2(2): I101
  • DOI: 10.4172/2376-0214.1000I101

Zebra Mussel Byssus Discs Detaching from Biofilm Coated Substratum

Robert E. Baier*
Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, USA
*Corresponding Author: Robert E. Baier, Distinguished Professor, Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, USA, Tel: 716 829-3560, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Feb 13, 2015 / Accepted Date: Mar 10, 2015 / Published Date: Mar 13, 2015

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Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are the most notorious of the invasive organisms introduced to the Great Lakes in recent years. They, like other surface-fouling mussels in many parts of the world, generally arrive at and attach with byssus discs and threads to substrata of power plants and water pipes that are already spontaneously fouled by the ubiquitous biofilms of proteins, bacteria, and often diatoms through which adhesion would seem to be prevented. The mystery of their attachment is resolved by these images, showing that the mussels’ attachment discs actually incorporate those biofilms into their extruded byssus disc adhesive substances, allowing nearly irreversible and strong attachment to the infrastructural substrata with a deterioration-resistant “glue”. Generally, water-blast cleaning breaks the byssus threads to leave behind the attached “beards” from both the mussels’ feet and on the substratum partners. These Images are for a rare interfacial separation event, that we have learned to reproduce with safe low-surface-energy coatings.

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Citation: Baier RE (2015) Zebra Mussel Byssus Discs Detaching from Biofilm Coated Substratum . J Biodivers Biopros Dev 2: i101. Doi: 10.4172/2376-0214.1000I101

Copyright: ©2015 Baier RE. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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