alexa Assessment of Decomposition Studies Indicates Need for Standardized and Repeatable Research Methods in Forensic Entomology | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2157-7145

Journal of Forensic Research
Open Access

Like us on:

OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

Research Article

Assessment of Decomposition Studies Indicates Need for Standardized and Repeatable Research Methods in Forensic Entomology

Jeffery K Tomberlin1*, Jason H Byrd2, John R Wallace3 and M Eric Benbow4

1Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA

2University of Florida College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, Gainesville, Florida, USA

3Department of Biology, Millersville University, Millersville, Pennsylvania, USA

4Department of Biology, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio, USA

*Corresponding Author:
Jeffery K. Tomberlin
2475 TAMU, Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas 77843, USA
Tel : 979.845.9718
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: February 21, 2012; Accepted date: April 12, 2012; Published date: April 14, 2012

Citation: Tomberlin JK, Byrd JH, Wallace JR, Benbow ME (2012) Assessment of Decomposition Studies Indicates Need for Standardized and Repeatable Research Methods in Forensic Entomology. J Forensic Res 3:147. doi:10.4172/2157-7145.1000147

Copyright: © 2012 Tomberlin JK, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

The National Research Council (NRC) released a report in 2009 discussing the “science” used in forensics. Specifically, the report outlined concerns regarding the state of the forensic sciences and what was needed to raise the level of rigor and reliability of these fields in a court of law. In response to this NRC document, the present paper examined several parameters used in decomposition studies that have implications for forensic entomology. Specifically, this analysis was conducted to determine the degree of repeatability in methods across studies as related to general conclusions drawn in court, entomology and forensic investigations. Forensic entomologists primarily analyze insect evidence recovered from decomposing remains to estimate a portion of the Period of Insect Activity (PIA), which encompasses the time of colonization, to infer a minimum Postmortem Interval (PMI). One method utilized by entomologists relies on succession data from published studies to generate estimates of the minimum PMI of a decedent. For this article, approximately 75 publications on arthropod succession on vertebrate carrion were reviewed for 13 criteria that are known to play instrumental roles in governing this process: 1) animal model, 2) time of actual death, 3) euthanasia method, 4) storage method, 5) storage time, 6) time of removal from storage to placement in the field, 7) time of day remains placed in the field, 8) catalog of arthropods associated with the remains over time 9) time of initial insect contact, 10) time of initial colonization (i.e., arthropod offspring located on the remains), 11) study site, 12) number of replicate carcasses and 13) months and season of study. These criteria were selected as they can directly impact arthropod colonization and succession patterns on vertebrate carrion and are easily recorded. Data indicated that such information is highly fragmented, and that key criteria necessary to repeat studies (a core principle of the scientific method) are often lacking in the published literature. As an example, among the studies included in this analysis, we could not find significant associations between arthropod taxa richness and carcass model or carcass size. In the case of carcass size, island biogeography theory predicts that larger areas/resources will hold higher diversity. We suspect that the high degree of reporting variability in taxonomic resolution and taxa-specific study focus precluded such relationships that have been reported for other disciplines of biology. Consequently, we suggest that, to date, because of these issues there has not been a comprehensive analysis (e.g., meta-analysis) to provide general inference of arthropod succession patterns on carrion to predict a minimum PMI. In order to begin standardizing such studies, we suggest that future research endeavors examining arthropod succession on carrion record detailed data for all of the suggested criteria. Doing so can result in data amassed over time for use in comprehensive and strong meta-analyses. Such results could allow for greater appreciation of variation associated with arthropod succession on carrion.

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2018-19
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

bornova escort

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

https://www.gaziantepescort.info

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2018 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version