alexa
Reach Us +44-1235425476
Biochroma - A New and Patented Technology for Processing Radioactive Wastewater from Nuclear Medicine Therapy Facilities in Hospitals and Clinics | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2155-9619

Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Radiation Therapy
Open Access

Like us on:

Our Group organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

Research Article

Biochroma - A New and Patented Technology for Processing Radioactive Wastewater from Nuclear Medicine Therapy Facilities in Hospitals and Clinics

José Canga Rodríguez*

José Canga Rodríguez, Key Account Manager - Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences Industry, EnviroChemie GmbH, In den Leppsteinswiesen 9, 64380 Rossdorf, Germany

Corresponding Author:
Dr. José Canga Rodríguez
Key Account Manager - Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences Industry
EnviroChemie GmbH, In den Leppsteinswiesen 9, 64380 Rossdorf, Germany
E-mail: [email protected] envirochemie.com

Received Date: August 19, 2011; Accepted Date: November 16, 2011; Published Date: November 19, 2011

Citation: Rodríguez JC (2011) Biochroma - A New and Patented Technology for Processing Radioactive Wastewater from Nuclear Medicine Therapy Facilities in Hospitals and Clinics. J Nucl Med Radiat Ther 2:117. doi: 10.4172/2155-9619.1000117

Copyright: © 2011 Rodríguez JC. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

While undergoing nuclear medicine therapy using 131I radioisotope at a hospital, patients generate wastewater with a considerable amount of radioactivity. Thus, contamination can reach levels of as much as 90% of the radioactive dose administered to the patient, depending on the type of therapy the patient underwent [1,2]. Given its radioactive half life of 8.02070 days, there is a significant risk of 131I radioisotope accumulation after its discharge into the sewer network (through sanitary wastewater) and into the environment. Therefore, it is advisable to collect this effluent in a separate system for its treatment prior to final discharge to the municipal sewer [3-8]. In spite of the clear scientific evidence of the severe contamination of this specific type of wastewater, a harmonised legal framework has still not been devised for all member states of the European Union. A survey conducted by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland clearly spotlights the discrepancies existing among concepts for managing radioactively contaminated effluents. The survey examined thirteen countries, six of which stipulate the installation of wastewater treatment systems (Table 1), three of which permit the wastewater to be discharged directly following dilution (Table 2) and four of which permit both options (Table 3), depending on the specific conditions of the respective sanitary system.

Recommended Conferences

Clinical Oncology & Radiation Therapy

Singapore, Singapore
Share This Page
Top