alexa Biological Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles by Bacte
ISSN: 2157-7439

Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology
Open Access

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Research Article

Biological Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles by Bacteria, Fungi and Plants

Nikolaos Pantidos and Louise E Horsfall*

School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

*Corresponding Author:
Louise E Horsfall
505 Darwin Building, School of Biological Sciences
The King’s Buildings, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
Tel: 0131-650-5363
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: July 30, 2014; Accepted Date: September 29, 2014; Published Date: October 09,2014

Citation: Pantidos N, Horsfall LE (2014) Biological Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles by Bacteria, Fungi and Plants. J Nanomed Nanotechnol 5:233. doi:10.4172/2157-7439.1000233

Copyright: ©2014 Pantidos N, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

 

Abstract

Over the past few decades interest in metallic nanoparticles and their synthesis has greatly increased. This has resulted in the development of numerous ways of producing metallic nanoparticles using chemical and physical methods. However, drawbacks such as the involvement of toxic chemicals and the high-energy requirements of production make it difficult for them to be widely implemented. An alternative way of synthesising metallic nanoparticles is by using living organisms such as bacteria, fungi and plants. This “green” method of biological nanoparticle production is a promising approach that allows synthesis in aqueous conditions, with low energy requirements and low-costs. This review gives an overview of some of these environmentally friendly methods of biological metallic nanoparticle synthesis. It also highlights the potential importance of these methods in assessing nanoparticle risk to both health and the environment.

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