alexa Can We Control the Progression of HIV by Monitor Marker
ISSN: 1948-5964

Journal of Antivirals & Antiretrovirals
Open Access

Like us on:
OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations

700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

Review Article

Can We Control the Progression of HIV by Monitor Markers of Microbial Translocation?

Wen-jun Zhang, Zhi-hong Guo, Jia-feng Zhang, Jun Jiang and Xiao-hong Pan*

Department of HIV/AIDS & STD control and prevention, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou, 310051, P.R.China

*Corresponding Author:
Xiao-hong Pan
Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease
Control and Prevention No.3399
Binsheng Road, Hangzhou
310051, P.R.China
Fax: 86-057-87115190
Tel: 86-0571-87115190
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: October 30, 2015 Accepted Date: January 02, 2015 Published Date: January 10, 2015

Citation: Zhang W, Guo Z, Zhang J, Jiang J, Pan X (2016) Can We Control the Progression of HIV by Monitor Markers of Microbial Translocation?. J Antivir Antiretrovir 8:001-005. doi: 10.4172/jaa.1000127

Copyright: © 2015 Zhang W, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

 

Abstract

This review summarizes microbial translocation in HIV infection. Microbial translocation can be measured by bacterial products in plasma, such as LPS and bacterial DNA or RNA fragments, or indirectly by LBP, sCD14, EndoCAb, and antiflagellin antibodies. In some study, these markers had contrary results. May be microbial translocation is not the sole driver of HIV progression. Several lines of research indicated that a major contributor to immune activation and disease progression during HIV infection was microbial translocation. Although successful treatment with ART increased GALT CD4+ T cells and suppresses HIV RNA, the numbers of these cells did not return to prior levels. There is a negative effect of mucosal immune dysfunction and microbial translocation on HIV disease progression in the presence of ART. The topic of microbial translocation and immune activation in HIV infection still is a research focus.

Keywords

Share This Page

Additional Info

Loading
Loading Please wait..
 
Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords