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Determinants of Treatment Failure Among Tuberculosis Patients on Directly Observed Theraphy in Rural Primary Health Care Centres in Ogun State, Nigeria | Abstract
ISSN: 2167-1079

Primary Healthcare: Open Access
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Research Article

Determinants of Treatment Failure Among Tuberculosis Patients on Directly Observed Theraphy in Rural Primary Health Care Centres in Ogun State, Nigeria

Amoran OE*

Department of Community Medicine and Primary Care, College of Health Sciences, Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Nigeria

Corresponding Author:
Amoran OE
Department of Community Medicine and Primary Care
Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital
Sagamu, Nigeria
E-mail:[email protected]

Received date: November 16, 2011; Accepted date: December 22, 2011; Published date: December 24, 2011

Citation: Amoran OE (2011) Determinants of Treatment Failure Among Tuberculosis Patients on Directly Observed Theraphy in Rural Primary Health Care Centres in Ogun State, Nigeria. Primary Health Care: Open Access 1:104. doi:10.4172/2167-1079.1000104

Copyright: © 2011 Amoran OE. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Introduction: Poor compliance with https://www.omicsonline.org/trauma-treatment.php (default) is thus a major impediment to effective tuberculosis (TB) chemotherapy worldwide even though free medication may be available, many patients may not be successfully treated. This study was designed to identify risk factors associated with treatment failure during TB treatment within the National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control Programme [NTBLCP programme] in rural primary health care centres in Nigeria. Methods: This study is a retrospective, cohort study. The information was collected from the facility record using a data collection form. A cohort of all TB patients attending clinic for treatment from 1st April 2004 to 30th June 2007 was used. A total sample of 938 patients was reviewed. Result: The overall treatment failure rate among the TB patients was 5.0% and [15.4%] of the entire negative outcome. In all, 749 [79.9%] of cases completed treatment and were cured, 135 (14.4%) defaulted, 47[5.0%] had treatment failure and 27 (2.9%) of cases were transferred out. Predictors of treatment failure were Relapse after previous treatment [RR=2.41, C.I=1.21-4.81] and far distance of domicile from PHC centre [RR=6.9, C.I=2.15-22.18]. There was no statistically significant difference in treatment failure between HIV positive and HIV negative TB patients [RR=2.65, C.I=0.63-11.09], cases transferred in [RR=2.24, C.I=0.35-14.55] and age (children RR=1.48, C.I=0.78- 2.42]). Conclusion: The previous treatment failure category presented with lower risk of current failure and better favourable outcome than cases of relapse suggesting that most of these failure might have been due to logistic failure rather than multi-drug resistance strain. This study indicates that National TB control programmes should pay a closer attention to stricter monitoring of patients that are transferred-in or relapse and are coming from far distances from PHC in order to prevent multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in rural African populations.

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