alexa
Reach Us +44-1647-403003
Early Second Trimester Asymmetric Growth and Mosaic Triploid Liveborn | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2165-7920

Journal of Clinical Case Reports
Open Access

Our Group organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations
700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

Case Report

Early Second Trimester Asymmetric Growth and Mosaic Triploid Liveborn

Jennifer L Czerwinski* and Manju Monga
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, Texas, USA
Corresponding Author : Jennifer L Czerwinski
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences
University of Texas Medical School at Houston
6410 Fannin Street, Suite 1217, Houston, Texas 77030, USA
Tel: 713-486-2290
Fax: 713-512-2214
E-mail: [email protected]
Received March 29, 2012; Accepted April 20, 2012; Published April 30, 2012
Citation: Czerwinski JL, Monga M (2012) Early Second Trimester Asymmetric Growth and Mosaic Triploid Liveborn. J Clin Case Rep 2:132. doi:10.4172/2165-7920.1000132
Copyright: © 2012 Czerwinski JL, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Background: Mosaic triploidy is uncommon in a liveborn. There have been no previous reports of prenatally diagnosed diploid/triploid mosaicism by amniocentesis. We present a case of prenatally diagnosed diploid/triploid mosaicism. Case: A 26 year old G3P1 presented for ultrasound at 21 weeks 5 days following a positive quad screen. Asymmetrical growth restriction, abnormal hand positioning and suspected heart defect were noted. Amniocentesis revealed mosaic triploidy; 69, XXX (10)/46, XX (6). Infant was delivered at 37 weeks by repeat cesarean section. Neonatal cord blood karyotype confirmed mosaic triploidy; 69, XXX (2)/46, XX (18). Conclusion: Prenatal diagnosis and subsequent outcome of a liveborn mosaic diploid/triploid infant has not been previously described. Our case demonstrates that diploid/triploid mosaicism may be diagnosed by amniocentesis and that the pregnancy may be managed to live birth near term.

Keywords

Recommended Conferences

World Conference on Clinical and Medical Case Reports

Perth, Australia
Share This Page
Top