alexa Facility-Based Delivery Service Utilisation Among Women of Childbearing Age in Nguti Health District, Cameroon: Prevalence and Predictors | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2161-0932

Gynecology & Obstetrics
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Research Article

Facility-Based Delivery Service Utilisation Among Women of Childbearing Age in Nguti Health District, Cameroon: Prevalence and Predictors

Chingwa Shiri Annette1, Buh Amos Wung1*, Keumami Katte Ivo1, Syvester Ndeso Atanga1,2, Nde Peter Fon1 and Julius Atashili1

1Department of Public Health and Hygiene, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63, Buea, Cameroon

2Department of Health Sciences, School of Health and Human Sciences, Saint Monica American International University, Buea, Cameroon

*Corresponding Author:
Buh Amos Wung
Department of Public Health and Hygiene
Faculty of Health Sciences
University of Buea, P.O. Box 63
Buea, Cameroon
Tel: +237674901233
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: November 11, 2016; Accepted date: December 13, 2016; Published date: December 20, 2016

Citation: Annette CS, Wung BA, Ivo KK, Atanga SN, Fon NP, et al. (2016) Facility- Based Delivery Service Utilisation Among Women of Childbearing Age in Nguti Health District, Cameroon: Prevalence and Predictors. Gynecol Obstet (Sunnyvale)6:416. doi: 10.4172/2161-0932.1000416

Copyright: © 2016 Annette CS, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Background: Maternal morbidity and mortality related to childbirth has remained a great challenge globally. One important strategy put in place to reduce maternal mortality related to childbirth is to increase number of women who deliver in a health facility. This study’s objectives were to determine the proportion of women who deliver in a health facility, assess factors influencing facility-based delivery service utilisation and determine the relationship between facility-based delivery service utilisation and participant’s socio-demographic characteristics in the Nguti Health District (NHD).
Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was carried-out among women who delivered at least once in NHD. Multistage sampling technique was used to select participants and data collected using a structured interviewer administered questionnaire. Data collected was analysed using Epi Info version 3.5.4.
Results: A total of 329 women took part in the study. The proportion of women who delivered in health facilities was 68.7%. Most women (59.0%) acknowledged having a health facility in their community with 145 (44.5%) women saying it takes more than 120 minutes to trek to the nearest health facility from their homes. The median monthly income of participants was 20,000FCFA (IQR: 15,000-40,000) and there was a statistical significant association with income and delivering in health facility.
Conclusion: Proportion of women using health facilities during delivery was above average, factors influencing health facility utilization during delivery include low average monthly income, traditional values associated with burying of placenta held by women, distance of health facilities from women’s home, sudden onset of labour and availability of TBA’s in communities. There was a statistically significant association between having high monthly income and delivering in health facility. Women need education on advantages of delivering in health facilities. Further studies need to be conducted for much longer durations and involving larger samples of women to determine other factors associated with health facility utilisation for deliveries.

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