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Heterosubtypic anti-avian H5N1 influenza antibodies in intravenous immunoglobulins from globally separate populations protect against H5N1 infection in cell culture | Abstract
ISSN: 1747-0862

Journal of Molecular and Genetic Medicine
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Short Communication

Heterosubtypic anti-avian H5N1 influenza antibodies in intravenous immunoglobulins from globally separate populations protect against H5N1 infection in cell culture

John S Sullivan1,2, Paul W Selleck3, Teena Downton1, Ingrid Boehm2,4, Anna-Maree Axell3, Yasmin Ayob5, Natalie M Kapitza1, Wayne Dyer4, Anna Fitzgerald6, Bradley Walsh6 and Garry W Lynch1,7,8*

1Biosafety, Immunobiology, Global Health and Pandemic Infections Research, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia,

2Children's Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia,

3The Australian Animal Health Laboratories, CSIRO, Geelong, Vic 3219, Australia,

4The Australian Red Cross Blood Service, 153 Clarence St, Sydney, NSW 2000, and Transfusion Medicine and Immunogenetics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW 2006,
Australia,

5The National Blood Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia,

6Minomic Pty Ltd, PO Box 6126, Frenchs Forest, NSW 2086, Australia,

7Faculty of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW and Oral Medicine, Westmead Centre for Oral Health, Westmead Hospital, NSW 2145, Australia

8Faculty of Dentistry, University of Sydney, Cellular and Molecular Pathology Research Unit, Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, Westmead Centre for Oral Health, Westmead Hospital, NSW 2145, Australia

*Corresponding Author:
Garry Lynch
Tel: +61 2 9519 8151
Fax: +61 2 9519 8151
Email: [email protected]

Received date: 31 August 2009, Revised date: 08 December 2009, Accepted date: 11 December 2009, Published online 23 December 2009

Citation: J Mol Genet Med (2009), 3(2), 217-224.

© Copyright The Authors: This is an open access article, published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/). This license permits noncommercial use, distribution and reproduction of the article, provided the original work is appropriately acknowledged with correct citation details.

Abstract

With antigenically novel epidemic and pandemic influenza strains persistently on the horizon it is of fundamental importance that we understand whether heterosubtypic antibodies gained from exposures to circulating human influenzas exist and can protect against emerging novel strains. Our studies of IVIG obtained from an infection-naive population (Australian) enabled us to reveal heterosubtypic influenza antibodies that cross react with H5N1. We now expand those findings for an Australian donor population to include IVIG formulations from a variety of northern hemisphere populations. Examination of IVIGs from European and South East-Asian (Malaysian) blood donor populations further reveal heterosubtypic antibodies to H5N1 in humans from different global regions. Importantly these protect against highly pathogenic avian H5N1 infection in vitro, albeit at low titres of inhibition. Although there were qualitative and quantitative differences in binding and protection between globally different formulations, the heterosubtypic antibody activities for the respective IVIGs were in general quite similar. Of particular note because of the relative geographic proximity to the epicentre of H5N1 and the majority of human infections, was the similarity in the antibody binding responses between IVIGs from the Malayan peninsula, Europe and Australia. These findings highlight the value of employing IVIGs for the study of herd immunity, and particularly heterosubtypic antibody responses to viral antigens such as those conserved between circulating human influenzas and emerging influenza strains such as H5N1. They also open a window into a somewhat ill defined arena of antibody immunity, namely heterosubtypic immunity.

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