alexa Is Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor a Possible Mechanism Underlying Risperidone Sensitization in Adolescent Rats?
ISSN: 2167-0501

Biochemistry & Pharmacology: Open Access
Open Access

OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations

700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

Research Article

Is Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor a Possible Mechanism Underlying Risperidone Sensitization in Adolescent Rats?

Qing Shu1,2, Gang Hu1*, and Ming Li2*
1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Department of Pharmacology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, P. R. China
2Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
Corresponding Authors : Gang Hu, MD, Ph.D
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration
Department of Pharmacology, Nanjing Medical University
40 Hanzhong Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, P.R. China
Tel: 86-25-86863108
Fax: 86-25-86863108
E-mail: [email protected]
  Ming Li, Ph.D
238 Burnett Hall, Department of Psychology
University of Nebraska- Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0308, USA
Tel: 402-472-3144
E-mail: [email protected]
Received February 21, 2013; Accepted March 26, 2013; Published March 28, 2013
Citation: Shu Q, Hu G, Li M (2013) Is Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor a Possible Mechanism Underlying Risperidone Sensitization in Adolescent Rats? Biochem Pharmacol (Los Angel) S1:004. doi:10.4172/2167-0501.S1-004
Copyright: © 2013 Shu Q, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Risperidone is one of the most widely used atypical antipsychotic drugs and is approved for the treatment of mental disorders (eg. schizophrenia, autism) in children and adolescents. The present study investigated the repeated treatment effect of risperidone and associated neurotropic mechanism in the phencyclidine (PCP)-induced hyperlocomotion model in adolescent rats. We examined whether repeated risperidone treatment would cause a sensitized inhibition of PCP-induced hyperlocomotion in adolescent rats, and whether such a sensitization effect was mediated by risperidone-induced alterations in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), an important biomarker which plays a role in neuropathology of schizophrenia and action of antipsychotic medications. Male adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (postnatal days [P] 44-48) were first treated with risperidone (0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg, sc) or vehicle and tested in the PCP (3.2 mg/kg, sc)-induced hyperlocomotion model for 5 consecutive days. Three days later, all rats were then challenged with risperidone (0.5 mg/kg) and PCP on ~P 51 to assess the potential sensitization effect. They were then sacrificed 1 day later and BDNF levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), striatum and hippocampus were examined using Western blotting. Behaviorally, repeated risperidone treatment progressively increased its inhibition of PCP-induced hyperlocomotion across the 5 test days. In the subsequent challenge test, rats previously treated with risperidone 1.0 mg/kg showed a stronger inhibition of the PCP-induced hyperlocomotion than those previously treated with vehicle, indicating a robust risperidone sensitization. However, no such group differences in the BDNF and its precursor proteins in any of the three brain regions were found. Therefore, although repeated adolescent risperidone administration induced a sensitization effect in the PCP-induced hyperlocomotion model in a dose-dependent fashion, whether BDNF is critically involved in this effect is still unsettled. Future work that directly manipulates BDNF systems is needed to further investigate this issue.

Keywords

Share This Page

Additional Info

Loading
Loading Please wait..
 
Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords