alexa Is Routine Brain CT Scan, Performed for Early Follow Up in Head Trauma Patients with GCS 14-15, Always Justified? | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2167-1222

Journal of Trauma & Treatment
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Research Article

Is Routine Brain CT Scan, Performed for Early Follow Up in Head Trauma Patients with GCS 14-15, Always Justified?

Kessel Boris1*, Itamar Ashkenazi2, Zeina Abdel Rauf3, Nachtigal Alicia3, Korin Alexander1, Khashan T RN1 and Ricardo Alfici2
1Trauma Unit, Hillel Yaffe Level 2 Trauma Center, Israel
2Surgical Division, Hillel Yaffe Level 2 Trauma Center, Israel
3Radiology Department, Hillel Yaffe Level 2 Trauma Center, Israel
*Corresponding Author : Boris Kessel, MD
Trauma Unit, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center
POB 169, Hadera, Israel 38100
Tel: 972-4-6304407
Fax: 972-4-6304545
E-mail: [email protected]
Received May 28, 2013; Accepted July 29, 2013; Published July 31, 2013
Citation: Boris K, Ashkenazi I, Rauf ZA, Alicia N, Alexander K, et al. (2013) Is Routine Brain CT Scan, Performed for Early Follow Up in Head Trauma Patients with GCS 14-15, Always Justified? J Trauma Treat 2:174. doi:10.4172/2167- 1222.1000174
Copyright: © 2013 Boris K, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Hypothesis : Routine repeat head Computed Tomography (CT) for patients with traumatic head injury, initially presenting with GCS of 14-15, does not change therapeutic policy in these trauma patients.

Methods : This was a retrospective cohort study of trauma patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 14-15 on admission, suffering from different types of intracranial bleeding who were admitted for observation in a level II trauma center. The size of hematoma on initial head CT was measured and compared to findings of repeat CT performed following 12 hours. Patients were evaluated as to changes in neurologic status and treatment.

Results: 68 patients treated over a period of 5 years were evaluated. Forty two (61.8%) were male and 24 (38.2%) were female. Mean age was 56.2 years and mean ISS score was 12 ± 5.1. Initial GCS was 15 in 51 patients and 14 in 15 other patients. CT scan revealed 7 epidural hematomas, 20 subdural hematomas, twenty eight intraparenchymal bleeding, and 13 subarchnoid hemorrhages. Repeat CT revealed an increase in size of the hematoma in 8 eight patients. None of these patients suffered from clinical deterioration. Repeat CT in 12 patients who’s GCS deteriorated, did not show any significant changes on the repeat CT scan. None of the patients underwent intervention after a routine repeat CT.

Conclusions: Routine repeat CT scan of head, performed 12 hours after the initial scan did not change the therapeutic policy in GCS 14-15 head trauma patients. The need for mandatory CT of head in mild traumatic brain injury should be questioned

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