alexa Let's Be Fair: Do Polling Locations Prime Votes?
ISSN: 2332-0761

Journal of Political Sciences & Public Affairs
Open Access

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Research Article

Let's Be Fair: Do Polling Locations Prime Votes?

Ben Pryor*, Jeanette Morehouse Mendez and Rebekah Herrick

Oklahoma State University, 201 Murray Hall, Stillwater, OK 74074, USA

*Corresponding Author:
Ben Pryor
Oklahoma State University
201 Murray Hall, Stillwater, OK 74074, USA
Tel: 1-405-503-5298
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: July 21, 2014; Accepted Date: September 30, 2014; Published Date: October 14, 2014

Citation: Pryor B, Mendez JM, Herrick R (2014) Let’s Be Fair: Do Polling Locations Prime Votes? J Pol Sci Pub Aff 2:126. doi:10.4172/2332-0761.1000126

Copyright: © 2014 Pryor B, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

 

Abstract

States are making it easier for voters to vote through alternative means, such as mail-in voting. This paper examines a potential benefit of this change: freer and fairer elections by depressing the priming effects of voting locations. A growing body of literature is examining the potential priming effects of voting locations with somewhat mixed results. This paper adds to the literature by examining voting on three ballot items on same-sex marriage and one on education in three states, and predicts that voters casting ballots in churches are less supportive of same-sex marriage and voter’s casting votes in schools are more supportive of education policies. We find that voter’s casting votes in schools are more likely to support an education ballot item; but we did not find voter’s casting votes in churches are less supportive of same-sex marriages, instead they are more supportive. Overall, the results do indicate substantial differences in voting preferences by voting location.

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