alexa Primary Succession Recapitulates Phylogeny
ISSN: 2329-9002

Journal of Phylogenetics & Evolutionary Biology
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Editorial

Primary Succession Recapitulates Phylogeny

Felix Bast*
Centre for Plant Sciences, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda, Punjab, India
Corresponding Author : Felix Bast
Centre for Plant Sciences
Central University of Punjab
Bathinda, Punjab, India
Tel: +91 98721 52694
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: January 04, 2016; Accepted: January 06, 2016; Published: January 12, 2016
Citation: Bast F (2016) Primary Succession Recapitulates Phylogeny. J Phylogenetics Evol Biol 4:e117. doi:10.4172/2329-9002.1000e117
Copyright: © 2016 Bast F. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
 

Abstract

The parallelism between the process of primary succession and the evolution of life on this planet is remarkable and conspicuous, yet never been spotted before. The order, at which each seral community appear, right from the pioneer species until the climax communities, is by the order of appearance of the respective evolutionary lineages in the tree of life. Evolutionary history of life on this planet is, in fact, a massive and ongoing process of primary succession, and I believe that is the rationale for this striking harmony. Central premise of this postulation is the idea that the plants that have been evolved to adapt to an almost naked landscape would be the first to colonize new environments. In light of this parallelism, fields of ecological succession and phylogenetic systematics can mutually compliment for resolving perplexed conundrums, and can potentially enlighten the future of life on the planet earth.

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