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Resistance-Sized Arteries Structure and Capillary Density Changes in Glioblastoma and Meningioma Peritumoral Brain Tissue | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2329-6895

Journal of Neurological Disorders
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Research Article

Resistance-Sized Arteries Structure and Capillary Density Changes in Glioblastoma and Meningioma Peritumoral Brain Tissue

Nicola Boari1*, Gianluca EM Boari2, Carolina De Ciuceis2, Enzo Porteri2, Luigi F Rodella3, Rita Rezzani3, Claudio Cornali4, Damiano Rizzoni2, Enrico Agabiti Rosei2 and Pietro Mortini1
1Department of Neurosurgery and Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Head and Neck Department, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy
2Clinica Medica, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy
3Chair of Human Anatomy, Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, University of Brescia, Italy
4Department of Neurosurgery, University of Brescia, Italy
Corresponding Author : Nicola Boari, M.D.
Department of Neurosurgery and Gamma Knife
Radiosurgery San Raffaele Scinetific Institute
Vita-Salute University, Via Olgettina 60
20132 Milano, Italy
Fax: +39-02-26437302
Tel: +39-02-26432396
E-mail: boari[email protected]
Received February 14, 2013; Accepted March 19, 2013; Published March 22, 2013
Citation: Boari N, Boari GEM, Ciuceis CD, Porteri E, Rodella LF, et al. (2013) Resistance-Sized Arteries Structure and Capillary Density Changes in Glioblastoma and Meningioma Peritumoral Brain Tissue. J Neurol Disord 1:106. doi: 10.4172/2329-6895.1000106
Copyright: © 2013 Boari N, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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Abstract

Background: Brain vessels play a relevant role in the development of malignant primary tumors. Previous studies performed in preclinical models of brain tumors demonstrated the irregular morphology of vessels in glioblastoma, characterized by multiple abnormalities in shape, permeability and relationship with the contacting structures, such as the basement membrane; however no data about microvascular structural alterations in the brain of patients affected by brain tumors have been previously reported. Methods: We studied small vessels structural alterations, microvascular rarefaction and vascular collagen content in the peritumoral brain tissue of two groups of patients, respectively affected by glioblastoma and by meningioma, who underwent a surgical operation in order to remove the tumor. The two groups of patients were matched for clinical, laboratory variables and risk factors, with the exception of sex. Results: Media to lumen ratio was significantly higher in patients with meningioma compared to patients affected by glioblastoma. Vessels in the brain surrounding glioblastomas show a less organized structure, as demonstrated by the thinner media, by the lower content in collagen and by the lower capillary density. Conclusions: For the first time, we used an in vitro ex vivo technique to analyze structural alterations of resistance sized arteries of peritumoral brain tissue at the radiological tumor-brain interface in patients affected by glioblastoma and meningioma. This approach, together with immunohistochemical evaluation of microvessel density, has supplied new data about the brain microcirculation. These findings can be the result of the aberrant angiogenic process that characterizes glioblastomas and can finally play a role in tumor growth. Further studies are needed to confirm our data, to identify the pathways that lead to this microvascular pattern and to identify possible clinical applications

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