alexa Secular Trends in Thyroid Disease and Self-Perceived Me
ISSN: 2327-4972

Family Medicine & Medical Science Research
Open Access

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Research Article

Secular Trends in Thyroid Disease and Self-Perceived Mental Stress Among Swedish Women: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study of the Two Cohorts 1980-1981 and 2004-2005 from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden

Linda Sandin, Valter Sundh and Dominique Hange*
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Corresponding Author : Dominique Hange
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Primary Health Care
Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg
Gothenburg, Sweden
Tel: +46-31-773 68 49
Fax: +46-31-778 17 04
E-mail: [email protected]
Received May 30, 2015; Accepted June 20, 2015; Published June 25, 2015
Citation: Sandin L, Sundh V, Hange D (2015) Secular Trends in Thyroid Disease and Self-Perceived Mental Stress Among Swedish Women: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study of the Two Cohorts 1980-1981 and 2004-2005 from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden. Fam Med Med Sci Res 4:176. doi:10.4172/2327-4972.1000176
Copyright: © 2015 Sandin L, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
 

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of thyroid disease among 38- and 50-year-old Swedish women in 1980-1981 and in 2004-2005. A second aim was to study whether there is any connection between deviant levels of TSH and mental stress or between diagnosed thyroid disease with normalized levels of TSH and mental stress.

Design: Prospective study.

Setting: Göteborg, Sweden, population about 4,30,000.

Subjects: This study is based on material from the Population Study of Women in Gothenburg. The participants are two representative samples of 38- and 50-year-old women who took part in examinations 1980-1981 and 2004-2005.

Main outcome measures: Prevalence of thyroid disease as well associations between mental stress and thyroid disease, studied cross-sectionally.

Results: The prevalence of thyroid disease has increased in both 38- (with 39%) and 50-year-old (with 56%) women between 1980-1982 and 2004-2005. There was a significant increase in the prevalence, from 0.9% (CI 0.2-2.6) to 3.4% (CI 1.7-6.2) of 50-year-old women with suppressed TSH. No connection was found between high mental stress and deviant levels of TSH. In the 38-year-old women there was a significant connection between high mental stress and diagnosed thyroid disease.

Conclusion: The results indicate that the prevalence of suppressed TSH in Swedish women has increased since the early eighties, and that mental symptoms can exist also in successfully treated thyroid disease. However, all of the changes observed consist of relatively few individuals and no certain conclusions can therefore be drawn from the results.

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