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ISSN: 2155-9899

Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology
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Commentary

Spin Trapping: A Review for the Study of Obesity Related Oxidative Stress and Na+/K+-ATPase

Athar Nawab1, Alexandra Nichols1, Rebecca Klug2, Joseph I. Shapiro1 and Komal Sodhi2*

1Department of Medicine, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, USA

2Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, Marshall University, USA

*Corresponding Author:
Komal Sodhi
Associate Professor of Surgery and Pharmacology
Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, WV 25701, USA
Tel: 304 691-1700
Fax: 914 347-4956
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: April 04, 2017; Accepted date: May 10, 2017; Published date: May 17, 2017;

Citation: Nawab A, Nichols A, Klug R, Shapiro JI, Sodhi K (2017) Spin Trapping: A Review for the Study of Obesity Related Oxidative Stress and Na+/K+-ATPase. J Clin Cell Immunol 8:505. doi: 10.4172/2155-9899.1000505

Copyright: © 2017 Nawab A, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

 

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have gained attention with mounting evidence of their importance in cell signaling and various disease states. ROS is produced continuously as a natural by-product of normal oxygen metabolism. However, high levels ROS causes oxidative stress and damage to biomolecules. This results in loss of protein function, DNA cleavage, lipid peroxidation, or ultimately cell injury or death. Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic; studies show fat accumulation is associated with increased ROS and oxidative stress. Evidence exists supporting oxidative stress as a factor driving forward insulin resistance (IR), potentially resulting in diabetes. Na+/K+-ATPase signaling is also a potential source of ROS promoting oxidative stress. The best way to observe radical species in biological systems is electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin trapping. EPR spin trapping is an important technique to study the mechanisms driving disease states attributed to ROS.

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