alexa Stress Hormone Levels in Awake Craniotomy and Craniotom
ISSN: 2155-9562

Journal of Neurology & Neurophysiology
Open Access

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Research Article

Stress Hormone Levels in Awake Craniotomy and Craniotomy under General Anesthesia

Nobusada Shinoura1*, Ryoji Yamada1, Kaoru Hatori2, Hiroshi Sato2, and Kohei Kimura2

1Department of Neurosurgery, Komagome Metropolitan Hospital, Hon-komagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan

2Department of Anesthesiology, Komagome Metropolitan Hospital, Hon-komagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan

Corresponding Author:
Nobusada Shinoura
Department of Neurosurgery
Komagome Metropolitan Hospital 3-18-22 Hon-komagome
Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677, Japan
Tel: +81-3-3823-2101
Fax: +81-3-3824-1552
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date: November 19, 2014; Accepted date: December 16, 2014; Published date: December 20, 2014

Citation: Shinoura N, Yamada R, Hatori K, Sato H, Kimura K (2014) Stress Hormone Levels in Awake Craniotomy and Craniotomy under General Anesthesia. J Neurol Neurophysiol 5:256. doi:10.4172/2155-9562.1000256

Copyright: © 2014 Shinoura N, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

 

Abstract

To compare stress levels between awake craniotomy and craniotomy under general anesthesia, we analyzed
plasma levels of adrenaline, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), noradrenaline and dopamine in a large
series of patients. Patients who underwent awake craniotomy in our hospital (n=110) were evaluated at 5 sample
times: immediately after arterial line insertion (T1); immediately after head fixation in a head frame (T2); 1 h after
start of incision (T3); immediately after relief of head fixation (T4); and immediately after arrival in the intensive care
unit (T5). Levels were then compared with those in 15 patients who underwent craniotomy under general
anesthesia. Plasma levels of adrenaline were significantly higher during awake craniotomy than in craniotomy under
general anesthesia at T1 to T4. Plasma levels of ACTH, cortisol, and noradrenaline in craniotomy were significantly
higher under general anesthesia than those in awake craniotomy at T5. No correlations were seen between plasma
levels of adrenaline in awake craniotomy and age, sex, preoperative Karnofsy Performance Scale score or
postoperative neurological status. In conclusion, plasma levels of adrenaline were significantly higher in awake
craniotomy than in craniotomy under general anesthesia during surgery, while plasma levels of cortisol, ACTH and
noradrenaline were significantly higher in craniotomy under general anesthesia than those in awake craniotomy just
after surgery.

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