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Tombstone ST Segment Elevation in Double Vessel Coronary Artery Disease; Who is the Culprit? | OMICS International | Abstract
ISSN: 2329-9517

Journal of Cardiovascular Diseases & Diagnosis
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Case Report

Tombstone ST Segment Elevation in Double Vessel Coronary Artery Disease; Who is the Culprit?

Yutthapong Temtanakitpaisan*, Renee Dallasen and Craig S. Smith
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Corresponding Author : Yutthapong Temtanakitpaisan
Division of Cardiology
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts
55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655, USA
Tel: 1-267-262-1720
E-mail: [email protected]
Received: July 07, 2015; Accepted: July 21, 2015; Published: July 23, 2015
Citation: Temtanakitpaisan Y, Dallasen R, Smith CS (2015) Tombstone ST Segment Elevation in Double Vessel Coronary Artery Disease; “Who is the Culprit?”. J Cardiovasc Dis Diagn 3:211. doi:10.4172/2329-9517.1000211
Copyright: © 2015 Temtanakitpaisan Y, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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Abstract

We describe a 66 year-old male who presented with chest pain and ST segment elevation in the anterior leads. The typical culprit lesion is in the left anterior descending artery (LAD). However, concomitant lesions in the other coronary arteries may make an accurate diagnosis of the actual “culprit lesion” more challenging. Understanding the electrical basis of electrocardiograms can provide important clues in identifying and treating the true lesion.

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