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ISSN: 2155-6180

Journal of Biometrics & Biostatistics
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  • Research Article   
  • J Biom Biostat 2017, Vol 8(6): 380
  • DOI: 10.4172/2155-6180.1000380

Tooth Growth in Ancient and Modern Times Inferred from Perikymata Growth Intervals; Modeled Statistically

Clifford Qualls1, Maria Antonietta Costa2, Mike Paffett3 and Otto Appenzeller4*
1Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA
2Institute of Archaeological Research and Museum, Catholic University of the North, R.P. Gustavo Le Paige S.J., Chile
3Fluorescence Microscopy Facility, Cancer Research and Treatment Center, Health Sciences Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA
4New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, New Mexico Health Enhancement and Marathon Clinics Research Foundation, , Albuquerque, NM, USA
*Corresponding Author : Otto Appenzeller, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, New Mexico Health Enhancement and Marathon Clinics Research Foundation, Albuquerque, NM, USA, Tel: 505 822 0269, Email: [email protected]

Received Date: Nov 09, 2017 / Accepted Date: Nov 24, 2017 / Published Date: Nov 30, 2017

Abstract

Tooth growth is essential to health and survival. In humans the growth rate can be inferred from the width of perikymata growth intervals. We hypothesized that in ancient times teeth grew faster than in modern humans. We measured the intervals between perikymata ridges on the surfaces of teeth and in thin sections of molars (which we used as standards) in ancient, prehistoric and modern humans. We compared statistically the results from ancient and modern specimens and assessed the impact of dietary factors and sociality on tooth growth. We found that ancient teeth grew faster than modern teeth (wider intervals) because of environmental, nutritional and life style influences. This apparently conferred evolutionary advantages for human survival. Our results gleaned from combining measurements of sections of teeth with modeling of web-available images suggest that life styles of modern humans have lead to smaller teeth.

Keywords: Tooth growth; Diet; Prehistoric times; Modern times; Sociality connectivity; Faster tooth growth; Smaller teeth modern times

Citation: Qualls C, Costa MA, Paffett M, Appenzeller O (2017) Tooth Growth in Ancient and Modern Times Inferred from Perikymata Growth Intervals; Modeled Statistically. J Biom Biostat 8: 380. Doi: 10.4172/2155-6180.1000380

Copyright: © 2017 Qualls C, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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