alexa Type 1 Diabetes and Physical Activity in Children and A
ISSN: 2155-6156

Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism
Open Access

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Review Article

Type 1 Diabetes and Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents

Leclair E1*, de Kerdanet M2, Riddell M1 and Heyman E3

1School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Canada

2Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, University Hospital of Rennes, France

3Univ Lille Nord de France, EA 4488 ‘Activité physique, Lille, France

*Corresponding Author:
Erwan Leclair
Department of Kinesiology and Health Science
York University, 4700 Keele Street
Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada
E-mail: [email protected]

Received date May 10, 2013; Accepted date June 17, 2013; Published date June 22, 2013

Citation: Leclair E, de Kerdanet M, Riddell M, Heyman E (2013) Type 1 Diabetes and Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents. J Diabetes Metab S10:004. doi: 10.4172/2155-6156.S10-004

Copyright: ©2013 Leclair E, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

 

Abstract

The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) often occurs in childhood; age and maturation of that patient come with elevated risk of developing microvacular complications and cardiac disease. Insulin treatment, diet control and physical activity are incorporated in T1D treatment, and childhood should be a time at which good diabetes control habits should be developed. Exercise clearly offers many health and psychological benefits, improves body composition, insulin sensitivity, glycemic control and quality of life. Unfortunately, T1D adolescents often do not achieve the recommended physical activity level and are sometimes less active than healthy adolescents. A clear statement about expected beneficial effects is required in order to encourage and to provide opportunities for engaging in physical activity since childhood foster the maintenance of an active lifestyle in adulthood. This review highlights the beneficial effects of physical activity in T1D children and adolescents and provides some guidance on how physical activity should be managed in this patient population.

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