alexa Usefulness of Resting Strain Rate Imaging to Predict Vi
ISSN: 2161-1025

Translational Medicine
Open Access

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Research Article

Usefulness of Resting Strain Rate Imaging to Predict Viability following Acute Myocardial Infarction Strain Rate Imaging and Myocardial Viability

Said Khaled, Salah Demerdash, Wael El-Mallah, Mohamed Ismail, Hossam Kashlan, Wail Nammas*

Cardiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University; Cairo, Egypt

*Corresponding Author:
Wail Nammas
Cardiology Department
Ain Shams University Hospitals
Faculty of Medicine
Ain Shams University
Abbassia, Cairo, Egypt
Tel: +2 012 4063718
Fax: +2 02 24820416
E-mail: [email protected]

Received Date: July 20, 2011; Accepted Date: August 18, 2011; Published Date: August 20, 2011

Citation: Khaled S, Demerdash S, El-Mallah W, Ismail M, Kashlan H, et al. (2011) Usefulness of Resting Strain Rate Imaging to Predict Viability following Acute Myocardial Infarction Strain Rate Imaging and Myocardial Viability. Translational Medic 1:101. doi:10.4172/2161-1025.1000101

Copyright: © Khaled S, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

 

Abstract

Background: We sought to explore the accuracy of resting strain (S) and strain rate (SR) to predict viability following myocardial infarction, taking 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy as the 'gold standard' for diagnosis. Methods: We enrolled 60 consecutive patients presenting for myocardial viability assessment at least 4 weeks following ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. S and SR rate were individually measured for all myocardial segments at rest. Based on the results of scintigraphy, both strain and strain rate were compared between viable and non-viable segments in each individual segment position. Results: S was significantly higher in viable as compared with non-viable segments in the basal inferior, basal anteroseptal, basal posterior, as well as apical inferior positions (p <0.05 for all). Otherwise, no significant difference was found between the S of viable and non-viable segments in the rest of positions (p >0.05 for all). Similarly, SR was significantly higher in viable as compared with non-viable segments in the mid-lateral, mid- and apical anterior, apical inferior, as well as basal anteroseptal positions (p <0.05 for all). Otherwise, no significant difference was found between the SR of viable and non-viable segments in the rest of positions (p >0.05 for all). Conclusion: In patients undergoing viability assessment following ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, resting values of both S and SR have a poor diagnostic accuracy, taking 99mTc-sestamibi imaging as the gold standard.

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