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Stress Incontinence

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  • Stress Incontinence

    Stress incontinence is the unintentional or uncontrollable leakage of urine. It is a serious and embarrassing disorder, which can lead to social isolation. Stress incontinence typically occurs when certain kinds of physical movement puts pressure on your bladder. Laughing, sneezing, coughing, jumping, vigorous exercise, and heavy lifting can all cause stress incontinence. Any pressure placed on the abdomen and bladder can lead to the loss of urine. It’s important to remember that the term “stress” is used in a strictly physical sense when describing stress incontinence. Emotional stress is not a factor in this type of urinary disorder. The “stress” refers to excessive pressure on the bladder. Both men and women can have episodes of stress incontinence. However, according to the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), women are twice as likely as men to suffer from involuntary leakage (NKUDIC). 

  • Stress Incontinence

    Pneumococcal bacteremia (bloodstream infection) cases total more than 50,000 each year in the United States (bacteremia occurs in approximately 25% of all pneumococcal pneumonia cases). The case fatality rate for those with pneumonia complicated by bacteremia is approximately 20%, but may be as high as 60% for elderly patients. Pneumococcal meningitis cases total about 3,000 each year in the United States, and the mortality rate is 10-30%. Pneumococcal pneumonia causes an estimated 175,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States, and has a case fatality rate of 5-7% (in the elderly this figure is higher). 

  • Stress Incontinence

    According to the National Institutes of Health, you might be a candidate for biofeedback therapy instead. (NIH) Biofeedback therapy is a treatment which uses instruments to help you to recognize the stimuli which lead to certain responses in your body and to modify them. In the treatment of urinary incontinence these instruments measure the contraction of the muscles in your bladder. Electrical stimulation is a treatment that sends a mild electrical current to the pelvic floor muscles. The current makes the muscles contract, mimicking a Kegel exercise. You may be able to contract the muscles yourself after feeling exactly which muscles are contracting. Medication There are several medications that are very effective in treating patients with stress incontinence. 

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