alexa Pseudogenes Contribute To Salmonella Typhi Pathogenesis In Humans
ISSN: 2155-9627

Journal of Clinical Research & Bioethics
Open Access

Like us on:
OMICS International organises 3000+ Global Conferenceseries Events every year across USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific Societies and Publishes 700+ Open Access Journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Open Access Journals gaining more Readers and Citations

700 Journals and 15,000,000 Readers Each Journal is getting 25,000+ Readers

This Readership is 10 times more when compared to other Subscription Journals (Source: Google Analytics)

3rd International Conference on Advanced Clinical Research and Clinical Trials
September 20-21, 2017 Dublin, Ireland

Guido C Mora
Universidad Andres Bello, Chile
ScientificTracks Abstracts: J Clin Res Bioeth
DOI: 10.4172/2155-9627-C1-002
Abstract
Salmonella enterica serovars, in spite of sharing a highly similar genomic content, exhibit a fundamental difference in the range of host they infect and in the disease they cause. Some serovars such as Salmonella typhimurium, are called generalist because they infect several mammalian hosts and other, such as Salmonella typhi, are called specialist because their target is one and only host, in this case the human being. S. typhi causes typhoid a systemic infection which is a potentially lethal disease in contrast to S. typhimurium causing a self-limited gastroenteritis, rarely lethal. The evolution of S. typhi towards a strictly human pathogen may have arisen by acquisition of new functions, loss of functions, or by a combination of both mechanisms. It is understandable that the gain of function can provide a selective advantage to a bacterium in a particular environment. Nevertheless, the loss of functions also can drive pathogen evolution, either by eliminating a function that reduces growth in a particular niche or by the energy savings associated with eliminating a function that is no longer needed. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the difference in the disease caused in humans by S. typhi and S. typhi and S. typhimurium is due to, at least in part, by the gain and/or loss of functions. This presentation will be dedicated to show that pseudogenization or the erosion of some genes may modify bacterial functions leading to a better fit in its host because the study of pathogenic mechanisms are hampered by the nature of its host. Our approach is to work with culture cell lines. This presentation will be dedicated to show the effect of two interesting pseudogenes, sseJ and marT. In S. typhimurium both are active genes encoding SseJ and MarT. The former corresponds to an acyltransferase/lipase that participates in Salmonella containing vacuole biogenesis in human epithelial cell lines and is needed for full virulence of S. typhimurium. On the contrary, our work suggest that sseJ inactivation in S. typhi has important role in the systemic infection. The latter is a transcriptional regulator as part of marT-fidL operon located at SPI-3. Our work shows that S. typhi expressing S. typhimurium marT-fidL exhibited an increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to a decreased survival in presence of H2O2 that also affected survival within macrophage-like cells. The genes loss included in this presentation are supporting the notion that pseudogenization in S. typhi is to gain a better fit and virulence in its host.
Biography

Guido C. Mora is working as an full professor, microbiology, School of Medicine, Universidad Andrés Bello, and adjunct professor San Diego state university previously he was the dean of ecology and natural resources 2007-2011, In 2009 he was the ambassador, American society for microbiology for Chile, Argentina, Uruguay y Paraguay his research includes the clinical research, microbiology, biochemistry, he participated in various national & international conferences all around the world. He published many articles in the reputed journals.

image PDF   |   image HTML
 
Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

engi[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version