alexa A domain in the transcription activator Gln3 specifically required for rapamycin responsiveness.
Bioinformatics & Systems Biology

Bioinformatics & Systems Biology

Metabolomics:Open Access

Author(s): Rai R, Tate JJ, Shanmuganatham K, Howe MM, Cooper TG

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Nitrogen-responsive control of Gln3 localization is implemented through TorC1-dependent (rapamycin-responsive) and TorC1-independent (nitrogen catabolite repression-sensitive and methionine sulfoximine (Msx)-responsive) regulatory pathways. We previously demonstrated amino acid substitutions in a putative Gln3 α-helix(656-666), which are required for a two-hybrid Gln3-Tor1 interaction, also abolished rapamycin responsiveness of Gln3 localization and partially abrogated cytoplasmic Gln3 sequestration in cells cultured under nitrogen-repressive conditions. Here, we demonstrate these three characteristics are not inextricably linked together. A second distinct Gln3 region (Gln3(510-589)) is specifically required for rapamycin responsiveness of Gln3 localization, but not for cytoplasmic Gln3 sequestration under repressive growth conditions or relocation to the nucleus following Msx addition. Aspartate or alanine substitution mutations throughout this region uniformly abolish rapamycin responsiveness. Contained within this region is a sequence with a predicted propensity to form an α-helix(583-591), one side of which consists of three hydrophobic amino acids flanked by serine residues. Substitution of aspartate for even one of these serines abolishes rapamycin responsiveness and increases rapamycin resistance without affecting either of the other two Gln3 localization responses. In contrast, alanine substitutions decrease rapamycin resistance. Together, these data suggest that targets in the C-terminal portion of Gln3 required for the Gln3-Tor1 interaction, cytoplasmic Gln3 sequestration, and Gln3 responsiveness to Msx addition and growth in poor nitrogen sources are distinct from those needed for rapamycin responsiveness. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
This article was published in J Biol Chem and referenced in Metabolomics:Open Access

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords