alexa A method to identify protein sequences that fold into a known three-dimensional structure.
Pharmaceutical Sciences

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Journal of Bioequivalence & Bioavailability

Author(s): Bowie JU, Lthy R, Eisenberg D

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Abstract The inverse protein folding problem, the problem of finding which amino acid sequences fold into a known three-dimensional (3D) structure, can be effectively attacked by finding sequences that are most compatible with the environments of the residues in the 3D structure. The environments are described by: (i) the area of the residue buried in the protein and inaccessible to solvent; (ii) the fraction of side-chain area that is covered by polar atoms (O and N); and (iii) the local secondary structure. Examples of this 3D profile method are presented for four families of proteins: the globins, cyclic AMP (adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate) receptor-like proteins, the periplasmic binding proteins, and the actins. This method is able to detect the structural similarity of the actins and 70- kilodalton heat shock proteins, even though these protein families share no detectable sequence similarity.
This article was published in Science and referenced in Journal of Bioequivalence & Bioavailability

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