alexa A novel social proximity test suggests patterns of social avoidance and gaze aversion-like behavior in BTBR T+ tf J mice.
Neurology

Neurology

Autism-Open Access

Author(s): Defensor EB, Pearson BL, Pobbe RL, Bolivar VJ, Blanchard DC,

Abstract Share this page

Abstract The BTBR T+ tf/J (BTBR) inbred mouse strain displays a low sociability phenotype relevant to the first diagnostic symptom of autism, deficits in reciprocal social interactions. Previous studies have shown that BTBR mice exhibit reduced social approach, juvenile play, and interactive behaviors. The present study evaluated the behavior of the BTBR and C57BL/6J (B6) strains in social proximity. Subjects were closely confined and tested in four experimental conditions: same strain male pairs (Experiment 1); different strain male pairs (Experiment 2); same strain male pairs and female pairs (Experiment 3); same strain male pairs treated with an anxiolytic (Experiment 4). Results showed that BTBR mice displayed decreased nose tip-to-nose tip, nose-to-head and upright behaviors and increased nose-to-anogenital, crawl under and crawl over behaviors. These results demonstrated avoidance of reciprocal frontal orientations in the BTBR, providing a parallel to gaze aversion, a fundamental predictor of autism. For comparative purposes, Experiment 3 assessed male and female mice in a three-chamber social approach test and in the social proximity test. Results from the three-chamber test showed that male B6 and female BTBR displayed a preference for the sex and strain matched conspecific stimulus, while female B6 and male BTBR did not. Although there was no significant interaction between sex and strain in the social proximity test, a significant main effect of sex indicated that female mice displayed higher levels of nose tip-to-nose tip contacts and lower levels of anogenital investigation (nose-to-anogenital) in comparison to male mice, all together suggesting different motivations for sociability in males and females. Systemic administration of the anxiolytic, diazepam, decreased the frequency of two behaviors associated with anxiety and defensiveness, upright and jump escape, as well as crawl under behavior. This result suggests that crawl under behavior, observed at high levels in BTBR mice, is elicited by the aversiveness of social proximity, and possibly serves to avoid reciprocal frontal orientations with other mice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
This article was published in Behav Brain Res and referenced in Autism-Open Access

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

  • 3rd International Conference on Epilepsy and Treatment
    September 01-17 Brussels, Belgium

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri, Food, Aqua and Veterinary Science Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Clinical and Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9040

Earth & Environmental Sciences

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science and Health care Journals

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics and Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Informatics Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Material Sciences Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Mathematics and Physics Journals

Jim Willison

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

John Behannon

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001 Extn: 9042

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords