alexa A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockade in severe persistent asthma.
Immunology

Immunology

Journal of Allergy & Therapy

Author(s): Wenzel SE, Barnes PJ, Bleecker ER, Bousquet J, Busse W

Abstract Share this page

RATIONALE: The treatment effect of golimumab, a human monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, in severe persistent asthma is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety and efficacy of golimumab in a large population of patients with uncontrolled, severe persistent asthma. METHODS: From 2004 to 2006, 309 patients with severe and uncontrolled asthma, despite high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta(2) agonists, were randomized 1:1:1:1 to monthly subcutaneous injections of placebo or golimumab (50, 100, or 200 mg) through Week 52. Coprimary endpoints were the change from baseline through Week 24 in prebronchodilator percent-predicted FEV(1) and the number of severe asthma exacerbations through Week 24. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: No significant differences were observed for the change in percent-predicted FEV1 (least squares mean: placebo, 2.44 [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.574 to 5.461]; combined 100-mg and 200-mg, 2.91 [0.696-5.116]) or severe exacerbations (mean +/- SD: placebo, 0.5 +/- 1.07 vs. combined 100-mg and 200-mg 0.5 +/- 0.97) through week 24. Through Week 24, 2.6% of patients treated with placebo vs. 19.5% of those treated with golimumab discontinued the study agent, and 1.3% and 7.8% discontinued study participation, respectively. An unfavorable risk-benefit profile led to early discontinuation of study-agent administration after the Week-24 database lock. Through Week 76, 20.5% of patients treated with placebo and 30.3% of patients treated with golimumab experienced serious adverse events, with serious infections occurring more frequently in golimumab-treated patients. One death and all eight malignancies occurred in the active groups. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, treatment with golimumab did not demonstrate a favorable risk-benefit profile in this study population of patients with severe persistent asthma. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00207740).

This article was published in Am J Respir Crit Care Med. and referenced in Journal of Allergy & Therapy

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

 
© 2008-2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords