alexa Abdominal wall reconstruction with dual layer cross-linked porcine dermal xenograft: the "Pork Sandwich" herniorraphy. 2 weeks), and a defect size greater than 300 cm(2). There were no hernia recurrences in our "Pork Sandwich" group, which contrasted favorably to the retrospective case-control group in which the hernia recurrence rate was 19\% (p = 0.038). DISCUSSION: For the repair of abdominal hernias, primary closure, with component separation as needed, with an underlay and overlay of cross-liked porcine xenograft should be considered to minimize risk of recurrent herniation. Additional long-term prospective comparative studies are needed for further validation of the optimal method and material for repair. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved."/>
Surgery

Surgery

Journal of Medical Implants & Surgery

Author(s): Satterwhite TS, Miri S, Chung C, Spain DA, Lorenz HP,

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Abstract INTRODUCTION: The repair of large ventral hernias is a challenging problem. This study investigated the use of decellularized, chemically cross-linked porcine dermal xenograft in conjunction with component separation (a.k.a. the "Pork Sandwich" Herniorraphy) in the repair of abdominal wall defects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively collected data over a 3-year period. Primary or near-total primary fascial closure was our goal in operative repair. A cross-linked porcine dermal xenograft mesh underlay and overlay were used to provide maximal reinforcement of the repair. Outcomes were compared with a case-controlled cohort of 84 patients who underwent ventral hernia repairs with alternative methods at our institution. RESULTS: Nineteen patients were included. Mean age was 55 years old, and mean body mass index (BMI) was 30 kg/m(2). Mean defect size was 321 cm(2). Post-operative complications were observed in ten out of 19 patients. Complications included seroma (n = 2), wound infection (n = 2), abscess (n = 1), skin necrosis (n = 6), and fistula formation (n = 3). Seven patients required re-operation. Statistically significant factors (p < 0.05) that contributed to increased post-operative complications or re-operation rates included smoking, presence of pre-operative enterocutaneous fistulae, extended post-operative hospital stay (>2 weeks), and a defect size greater than 300 cm(2). There were no hernia recurrences in our "Pork Sandwich" group, which contrasted favorably to the retrospective case-control group in which the hernia recurrence rate was 19\% (p = 0.038). DISCUSSION: For the repair of abdominal hernias, primary closure, with component separation as needed, with an underlay and overlay of cross-liked porcine xenograft should be considered to minimize risk of recurrent herniation. Additional long-term prospective comparative studies are needed for further validation of the optimal method and material for repair. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This article was published in J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg and referenced in Journal of Medical Implants & Surgery

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