alexa Absence of relation between depressive symptoms and carotid intimal medial thickness in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.
Psychiatry

Psychiatry

Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

Author(s): Rice SC, Zonderman AB, Metter EJ, Najjar SS, Waldstein SR

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Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between longitudinal trajectories of depressive symptoms as well as history of significant symptoms and subsequent carotid intimal medial thickness (IMT) among participants enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging and to assess longitudinal covariation of depressive symptoms and carotid IMT over two time points. Prior literature has identified inconsistent cross-sectional associations between depressive symptoms and carotid IMT in healthy persons, and existing longitudinal work has relied on depression assessment at a single time point. METHODS: A total of 556 participants (303 women and 253 men), aged 20 to 93 years (mean +/- standard deviation = 55.8 +/- 15.9 years), completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale from one to eight times over 1 to 15 years. Participants later underwent high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography to assess IMT of the far wall of the common carotid artery. A subset of these participants (n = 68) underwent reassessment of IMT an average of 3.9 years later. Linear and mixed-effects regression models were adjusted for sex, race, education, systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, diabetes, smoking, and antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and antidepressant medications. RESULTS: There was no relation between trajectory of depressive symptoms or history of significant depressive symptoms and future carotid IMT. There was also no evidence for longitudinal covariation of depressive symptoms and IMT over time. Additional analyses similarly revealed a lack of significant associations. CONCLUSION: There is no association between depressive symptoms and carotid IMT in the present sample of healthy community-dwelling volunteers.
This article was published in Psychosom Med and referenced in Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy

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