alexa Adhesion formation in intubated rabbits increases with high insufflation pressure during endoscopic surgery.
Reproductive Medicine

Reproductive Medicine

Clinics in Mother and Child Health

Author(s): Yesildaglar N, Koninckx PR

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Abstract The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that the increase in adhesion formation by CO(2) pneumoperitoneum is caused by mesothelial hypoxaemia. Therefore the effect of the intra-abdominal pressure together with the flow rate upon adhesion formation was evaluated in rabbits following laser and bipolar lesions during endoscopic surgery using humidified CO(2) at 35 +/- 1 degrees C. The intra-abdominal pressure and flow rate were 5 mmHg and 1 l/min in group 1 (n = 5), 5 mmHg and 10 l/min in group 2 (n = 4), 20 mmHg and 1 l/min in group 3 (n = 5) and 20 mmHg and 10 l/min in group 4 (n = 4) respectively. A rapid and reliable intubation method for rabbits was developed to permit high insufflation pressure. By two-way analysis of variance, total adhesion scores following a laser lesion increased with flow rate (P = 0.0003) and insufflation pressure (P = 0.002). Total adhesion scores of bipolar lesions increased with pressure (P = 0.02) but not with flow rate (P = 0.1). The total adhesion scores of laser and bipolar lesions together increased with flow rate (P = 0.005) and with insufflation pressure (P = 0.004). There was no statistical interaction between flow rate and insufflation pressure. In conclusion, the insufflation pressure in endoscopic surgery with CO(2) pneumoperitoneum is a co-factor in adhesion formation, together with desiccation.
This article was published in Hum Reprod and referenced in Clinics in Mother and Child Health

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