alexa Amyloid beta, mitochondrial dysfunction and synaptic damage: implications for cognitive decline in aging and Alzheimer's disease.
Neurology

Neurology

Journal of Alzheimers Disease & Parkinsonism

Author(s): Reddy PH, Beal MF

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Abstract Recent studies of postmortem brains from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and transgenic mouse models of AD suggest that oxidative damage, induced by amyloid beta (Abeta), is associated with mitochondria early in AD progression. Abeta and amyloid-precursor protein are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron-transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage and prevent neurons from functioning normally. Furthermore, accumulation of Abeta at synaptic terminals might contribute to synaptic damage and cognitive decline in patients with AD. Here, we describe recent studies regarding the roles of Abeta and mitochondrial function in AD progression and particularly in synaptic damage and cognitive decline.
This article was published in Trends Mol Med and referenced in Journal of Alzheimers Disease & Parkinsonism

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