alexa Anti-platelet therapy in the prevention of hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma.
Biochemistry

Biochemistry

Biochemistry & Analytical Biochemistry

Author(s): Sitia G, Iannacone M, Guidotti LG

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Abstract Previous studies in mouse models of self-limited viral hepatitis showed that platelets contribute to acute liver damage by promoting the intrahepatic accumulation of virus-specific CD8 T cells and, secondarily, virus-non-specific inflammatory cells. Built on these observations, a recent preclinical study took advantage of a previously established hepatitis B virus (HBV) transgenic mouse model of immune-mediated chronic hepatitis that progresses to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to demonstrate that clinically achievable doses of the anti-platelet drugs aspirin and clopidogrel - administered continuously after the onset of liver disease - can prevent hepatocarcinogenesis and greatly improve overall survival. These outcomes were preceded by and associated with reduced hepatic accumulation of virus-specific CD8 T cells and virus-non-specific inflammatory cells, reduced hepatocellular injury and hepatocellular proliferation, and reduced severity of liver fibrosis. The observation that anti-platelet therapy inhibits HCC development identifies platelets as key players in the pathogenesis of HBV-associated liver cancer and supports the notion that a sustained immune-mediated necroinflammatory liver disease is sufficient to trigger HCC. The results abovementioned and their clinical implications are discussed in this report. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. This article was published in J Hepatol and referenced in Biochemistry & Analytical Biochemistry

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