alexa Are prognostic indicators for poor outcome different for acute and chronic low back pain consulters in primary care?
General Science

General Science

Journal of Ergonomics

Author(s): Grotle M, Foster NE, Dunn KM, Croft P

Abstract Share this page

Abstract Few studies have investigated whether prognostic indicators, which contribute to the transition from acute to chronic low back pain (LBP), are also those which contribute to continuing persistence of chronic LBP. We compared the contribution of physical, psychological and social indicators to predicting disability after one year between consulters with LBP of less than 3 months duration and more than 3 months duration. Data from two large prospective cohort studies of consecutive patients consulting with LBP in general practices were merged, providing complete data for 258 cases with acute/subacute LBP and 668 cases with chronic LBP at 12 months follow-up. There were significant differences between the two LBP groups in baseline characteristics and clinical course of disability, assessed by Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, during the year of follow-up. Adjusted associations between potential prognostic indicators and disability at 12months were carried out in the two LBP subgroups. The final multivariable regression models showed that being non-employed, having widespread pain, a high level of Chronic Pain Grade, and catastrophising were the strongest prognostic indicators for disability at 12 months in both LBP groups. Fear of pain was significantly associated with disability in chronic LBP. Importantly, beyond baseline disability, the effect size of the other prognostic indicators for poor outcome was rather low. These findings must continue to challenge researchers to identify useful early predictors of outcome in persons with disabling back pain, as screening and targeted treatment approaches are dependent upon prognostic indicators with clinical significance. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
This article was published in Pain and referenced in Journal of Ergonomics

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords