alexa Association of the predominant symptom with clinical characteristics and pathophysiological mechanisms in functional dyspepsia.
Medicine

Medicine

Internal Medicine: Open Access

Author(s): Karamanolis G, Caenepeel P, Arts J, Tack J

Abstract Share this page

Abstract BACKGROUND & AIMS: Functional dyspepsia (FD) is considered a heterogeneous disorder with different pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to the symptom pattern. The Rome II committee proposed that subdividing patients with FD into groups with predominant pain versus discomfort might identify subgroups with homogeneous pathophysiological and clinical properties. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship of predominant pain or discomfort with pathophysiological mechanisms and to evaluate whether considering individual predominant symptoms yields better results. METHODS: Consecutive FD patients (n = 720; 489 women; mean age, 41.3 +/- 0.6 years) filled out a dyspepsia questionnaire and identified a single most bothersome symptom. We analyzed the association of this predominant symptom with demographic, clinical, and pathophysiological features (Helicobacter pylori status, gastric emptying in 592 patients, and gastric sensitivity and accommodation testing in 332 patients). RESULTS: According to Rome II criteria, 22\% were pain predominant and 78\% discomfort predominant. Patients with predominant pain had a higher prevalence of hypersensitivity (44\% vs 25\%) and delayed gastric emptying was observed less frequently in these patients (16\% vs 26\%), but there was major overlap. Detailed analysis showed that any of 8 dyspeptic symptoms could be predominant. Predominant early satiety or vomiting was associated with significantly higher prevalences of weight loss (89\% and 75\%, respectively) and of acute onset (61\% and 60\%, respectively). Impaired accommodation was found in 79\% of patients with predominant early satiety. The highest prevalence of delayed emptying was found in predominant fullness (38\%) and of hypersensitivity in predominant pain (44\%). CONCLUSIONS: Subdividing FD patient groups according to the predominant symptom does not reliably identify subgroups with a homogeneous underlying pathophysiological mechanism. This article was published in Gastroenterology and referenced in Internal Medicine: Open Access

Relevant Expert PPTs

Relevant Speaker PPTs

Recommended Conferences

  • 22nd World Cardiology Conference
    December 11-12, 2017 Rome, Italy

Relevant Topics

Peer Reviewed Journals
 
Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals
International Conferences 2017-18
 
Meet Inspiring Speakers and Experts at our 3000+ Global Annual Meetings

Contact Us

Agri & Aquaculture Journals

Dr. Krish

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Biochemistry Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Business & Management Journals

Ronald

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Chemistry Journals

Gabriel Shaw

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9040

Clinical Journals

Datta A

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9037

Engineering Journals

James Franklin

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

Food & Nutrition Journals

Katie Wilson

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

General Science

Andrea Jason

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9043

Genetics & Molecular Biology Journals

Anna Melissa

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9006

Immunology & Microbiology Journals

David Gorantl

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9014

Materials Science Journals

Rachle Green

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Nursing & Health Care Journals

Stephanie Skinner

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9039

Medical Journals

Nimmi Anna

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9038

Neuroscience & Psychology Journals

Nathan T

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9041

Pharmaceutical Sciences Journals

Ann Jose

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9007

Social & Political Science Journals

Steve Harry

[email protected]

1-702-714-7001Extn: 9042

 
© 2008- 2017 OMICS International - Open Access Publisher. Best viewed in Mozilla Firefox | Google Chrome | Above IE 7.0 version
adwords