alexa Automated extraction of DNA from biological stains on fabric from crime cases. A comparison of a manual and three automated methods.
General Science

General Science

Journal of Forensic Research

Author(s): Stangegaard M, Hjort BB, Hansen TN, Hoflund A, Mogensen HS, , Stangegaard M, Hjort BB, Hansen TN, Hoflund A, Mogensen HS,

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Abstract The presence of PCR inhibitors in extracted DNA may interfere with the subsequent quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) reactions used in forensic genetic DNA typing. DNA extraction from fabric for forensic genetic purposes may be challenging due to the occasional presence of PCR inhibitors that may be co-extracted with the DNA. Using 120 forensic trace evidence samples consisting of various types of fabric, we compared three automated DNA extraction methods based on magnetic beads (PrepFiler Express Forensic DNA Extraction Kit on an AutoMate Express, QIAsyphony DNA Investigator kit either with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen or an in-house optimized sample pre-treatment on a QIAsymphony SP) and one manual method (Chelex) with the aim of reducing the amount of PCR inhibitors in the DNA extracts and increasing the proportion of reportable STR-profiles. A total of 480 samples were processed. The highest DNA recovery was obtained with the PrepFiler Express kit on an AutoMate Express while the lowest DNA recovery was obtained using a QIAsymphony SP with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen. Extraction using a QIAsymphony SP with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen resulted in the lowest percentage of PCR inhibition (0\%) while extraction using manual Chelex resulted in the highest percentage of PCR inhibition (51\%). The largest number of reportable STR-profiles was obtained with DNA from samples extracted with the PrepFiler Express kit (75\%) while the lowest number was obtained with DNA from samples extracted using a QIAsymphony SP with the sample pre-treatment recommended by Qiagen (41\%). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. This article was published in Forensic Sci Int Genet and referenced in Journal of Forensic Research

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