alexa B10 cells and regulatory B cells balance immune responses during inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer.
Pharmaceutical Sciences

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Pharmaceutica Analytica Acta

Author(s): DiLillo DJ, Matsushita T, Tedder TF

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Abstract The ability of B cells to negatively regulate cellular immune responses and inflammation has only recently been described. Hallmark papers from a number of distinguished laboratories have identified phenotypically diverse B-cell subsets with regulatory functions during distinct autoimmune diseases, including IL-10-producing B cells, CD5+ B-1a cells, CD1d+ marginal zone B cells, and transitional-2-marginal zone precursor B cells. Most recently, a numerically rare and phenotypically unique CD1dhiCD5+CD19hi subset of regulatory B cells has been identified in the spleens of both normal and autoimmune mice. CD1dhiCD5+ B cells with the capacity to produce IL-10 have been named B10 cells as they produce IL-10 exclusively and are the predominant B-cell source of IL-10. Remarkably, B10 cells are potent negative regulators of inflammation and autoimmunity in mouse models of disease in vivo. Herein, our current understanding of B10-cell development and function is reviewed in the context of previous studies that have identified and characterized regulatory B cells, emerging evidence for B10-cell regulation of tumor immunity, and the likelihood that B10 cells exist in humans. This article was published in Ann N Y Acad Sci and referenced in Pharmaceutica Analytica Acta

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